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Opponents of Pier replacement gamble on election

Concerned Citizens of St. Petersburg will look to leverage the cost of a potential special election when it meets with city officials at an April 18 workshop about the Pier.

Here's the pitch: If the group gets enough signatures to force an initiative, the city would have to conduct that election within 90 days of the submission. A special election would run the city (and taxpayers) $250,000.

Concerned Citizens member Gene Smith said the organization is willing to time the submission so that the Aug. 27 primary election would fall within the 90-day window, thus saving the expense of an added election.

However, it's willing to do that only if the city suspends scheduled payments to the firm that designed the Lens.

With each payment, it grows more difficult to scuttle the project and kiss those funds goodbye. It's a poker match, and I'm not sure who will blink first. …

Seen on a T-shirt: You pay peanuts, you get monkeys. …

Tracie Domino and Ann Sells Miller founded a group last year that is novel and simple. The 100 Women of Tampa Bay each chipped in $100, fielded proposals from nonprofits and chose Suncoast Voices for Children to get a $10,000 donation. No extra meetings, no stringent membership requirements.

"We founded the group as a way to prove that by pooling our small individual donations we could be incredibly impactful in our community," Domino said. …

I would complain about House Speaker Will Weatherford's desire to raise tuition at state colleges, again, but it's on the kids. My sons — and every other student — should be marching on the state capital.

We can't do it for you.

That's all I'm saying.

Opponents of Pier replacement gamble on election 03/31/13 [Last modified: Sunday, March 31, 2013 7:14pm]
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