Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Q&A: US Airways jet pulled from Hudson will be sold for salvage in pieces

The fuselage of the US Airways jet that landed in the Hudson River was moved to a Kearny, N.J., salvage yard in late January.

Associated Press

The fuselage of the US Airways jet that landed in the Hudson River was moved to a Kearny, N.J., salvage yard in late January.

US Airways jet won't fly again

Capt. Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger famously landed his US Airways jet on the Hudson River on Jan. 15 after it was disabled by birds flying into the engines. Whatever happened to the plane? Was it repaired and is it now flying again?

After the emergency splashdown, the Airbus A320 slowly drifted south in the frigid Hudson. Only about half of the tail fin and rudder were above water when a Fire Department boat tugged the plane to the southern tip of Manhattan and docked it there. Both engines broke off, settling into muck and thick sediment 30 to 50 feet down.

After a recovery mission, the National Transportation Safety Board directed a teardown of the plane's engines and found bird remains. The aircraft was moved to a Kearny, N.J., salvage yard. It is expected to remain there while the NTSB completes its investigation, which could take 12 to 18 months.

Once the NTSB concludes its investigation, the disassembled plane will be sold for salvage. It will not be repaired and will not fly again, according to Chartis, the company that insured the aircraft.

On Oct. 1, the 58-year-old Sullenberger piloted a flight from New York's LaGuardia Airport to Charlotte, N.C. — the same planned route as the ill-fated January flight. He goes on a tour this month for his book, Highest Duty: My Search for What Really Matters, and will then teach other pilots at a US Airways flight training school.

Issuing tsunami alerts

Recent news reports of earthquakes at sea have been a mixed bag in terms of whether a tsunami alert was sounded. As I understand it, tsunamis result only from earthquakes that cause the sea floor to drop, not from quakes involving lateral plate movement. Is there something in seismic readings that indicates an earthquake's origin, and thus whether a tsunami alert is needed?

Seismologist Paul Richard of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University says the main reasons for issuing an alert are the size and location of an earthquake. The question is whether the quake is located in an area that has been associated with tsunamis in the past, and whether it is powerful enough to cause another one.

A tsunami can be caused by movement of the sea floor up or down, and it is also possible for a lateral quake to generate one if it results in an underwater landslide. Thus a calculation that seismic movement was lateral would not be sufficient to deny a warning, he said.

"Just the size of the earthquake is usually enough to set the ball rolling," Richard said.

No relation

Josh Duhamel and Timothy Olyphant look strikingly similar. Are they related?

They are not.

Q&A: US Airways jet pulled from Hudson will be sold for salvage in pieces 10/20/09 [Last modified: Tuesday, October 20, 2009 12:14am]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Florida's 'Turtle God' is ailing. What happens to his remarkable collection of specimens?

    Wildlife

    OVIEDO — In a small town about five miles from the University of Central Florida there stands a two-story yellow house built in the 1920s. A modest sign mounted on the wall next to the front door says, "Chelonian Research Institute."

    The main room at the Chelonian Institute in Oviedo Florida. - Peter Pritchard sounds British but he's lived in Florida for five decades, running the Chelonian Institute in Oviedo Florida, which holds the world's largest collection of turtle specimens (some of them bones or shells, some of them live turtles or tortoises). Time magazine has declared him a hero of the planet and other turtle experts say he is to turtles what Dian Fossey was to gorillas. He's been instrumental in helping other species, too, including the Florida panther. He has traveled the world studying turtles.
  2. Regulator blasts Wells Fargo for deceptive auto insurance program

    Banking

    Wells Fargo engaged in unfair and deceptive practices, failed to properly manage risks and hasn't set aside enough money to pay back the customers it harmed, according to a confidential report by federal regulators.

    Wells Fargo engaged in unfair and deceptive practices, failed to properly manage risks and hasn't set aside enough money to pay back the customers it harmed, according to a confidential report by federal regulators.
[Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images, 2017]
  3. Top 5 at Noon: Police hunt killer 'terrorizing' Seminole Heights; Land swap could help bring Rays to Tampa

    Blogs

    Here are the top stories on Tampabay.com this afternoon.

    Aerial photo of Ybor City centered around Centro Ybor and 7th Avenue. Hoping to assemble the land for a ballpark near Ybor City and the Channel District, Hillsborough County officials could government property with landowners there.
  4. McDonald's soft serve in Florida is made with handshakes and happy cows

    Consumer

    Floridians licked nine million McDonald's vanilla cones last year.

    Calves play with a rubber toy at the Milking R Dairy in Okeechobee, FL. Owners Sutton Rucks, Jr., and his wife Kris Rucks sell their milk to SouthEast Dairies cooperative, Edward Coryn of Dairy Mix in St. Petersburg buys it, transforms it into soft-serve ice cream base, and sells it to all the McDonald's. SCOTT KEELER   |   Times

  5. Florida football has become something to be endured, not enjoyed

    College

    The Jim McElwain era at Florida is something to be endured, not enjoyed.

    Florida Gators defensive lineman Khairi Clark (54) leaves the field after the Florida Gators game against Texas A&M, at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium, in Gainesville, Fla. The Florida Gators lost to the Texas A&M Aggies 17-16 MONICA HERNDON   |   Times
.