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North Pinellas History | A look back

Radio system tracks Truman-Dewey results

CIRCA 1940: A group of World War II volunteers poses for a photograph outside a building that served as the Red Cross Headquarters in Clearwater on Court Street. This scene was just east of the Pinellas County Courthouse.

Courtesy of Mike Sanders

CIRCA 1940: A group of World War II volunteers poses for a photograph outside a building that served as the Red Cross Headquarters in Clearwater on Court Street. This scene was just east of the Pinellas County Courthouse.

Fast coverage of the Truman-Dewey presidential race was planned for WTSP listeners Tuesday night.

The Mutual Broadcasting System presented the national returns continuously from the time the polls closed until a president was elected. Local and county returns were presented periodically. The Times-WTSP winners-losers party was a special event at 11 p.m.

A special vote-tabulating center was established in the ballroom of New York's Ritz Carlton Hotel where Dr. Louis H. Bean, vote expert, economist and author of the best-selling publication How to Predict Elections, directed computations of vote returns from all the voting precincts in the country, breaking down the statistics into percentage and number-total reports.

Seventy-three special broadcasting crews and newsmen were set in pivotal areas throughout the country for the up-to-the-minute facts in those districts and to provide all the voting color coincident with the heated campaigns there.

Microphones were constantly with the leading candidates to report their reactions as the votes streamed in.

Oct. 31, 1948

February set for filming Tarpon movie

TARPON SPRINGS — From Ahmad Kamal in Hollywood, author of the book Full Fathoms Five, came a report that production on the picture based on his book was to get under way sometime in February, with location shots being filmed at Tarpon Springs.

The movie was to be produced by Twentieth-Century Fox and directed by Elia Kazan. Richard Murphy, screenwriter, was completing the screenplay.

Kazan and Murphy were visitors in Tarpon Springs several months ago, at which time they gathered necessary material for use in the screen story.

Kamal's book, which was released by Doubleday in September, is a story of the men who live dangerously while sponge diving with the fleet at Tarpon Springs.

While no definite information as to the cast had been given, it was reported that Gregory Peck and Dana Andrews, stars of Twentieth-Century Fox, were to be cast in the roles of the two brothers of Greek descent.

Nov. 1, 1956

Three houses built daily in Clearwater

CLEARWATER — During October, single-family residences were built here at the rate of three and one-third each day for the 23 working days, it was revealed yesterday by Miss Elizabeth Anderson, city building inspector.

There were 78 one-family residences costing $720,500, or an average of more than $9,000 each.

Nov. 4, 1956

Report: Hopefuls spend up to $2,882

CLEARWATER — "What price, politics?" asked courthouse observers, analyzing Pinellas candidates' reports on what they spent and received from supporters since the May primaries.

Fifteen candidates seeking election Tuesday to the Legislature, Senate, County Commission and Sheriff's Office reported spending $9,650.47 from May through September. October activities were due at noon Monday at the courthouse under Florida's "who gave it; who got it" election law, which was sponsored by the Times.

The 15 listed campaign contributions were shown to be $12,583.60 from May through September.

The biggest spender was reported to be Hubert Rutland Sr., who was a Democratic candidate for state Senate. He listed five months' expenses at $2,882.53 and contributions from 40 persons at $2,515.99.

His Republican opponent, J. Frank Houghton, who was seeking re-election as senator, reported $74.78 in expenses and no contributions during the same period.

The only candidate who reported nothing spent or contributed to his cause since May was James Earle, who was a Democratic candidate for the Group 2 legislative seat.

Nov. 3, 1929

Being 'one-eyed' auto driver is costly

CLEARWATER — Motorists who were arrested in the drive to eliminate the "one-eyed" driver from Pinellas highways found that the fines meted out — $1 and costs — were not as easy to pay as they sounded.

The $1 item was small, true, but when it came to the costs, that was another matter.

In cases which were tried here, wherein the motorist either pleaded guilty or was found guilty of driving an improperly lighted automobile, the costs often ran as high as $10 or more, depending on whatever amounts were allowed for mileage of the officer going to and from the point of arrest.

The courts also had the authority to collect $2.25 for arrest and return; 12 cents per mile; $4, which the officer got for his court appearance, and, if bail was posted, $1.50, or if the party was committed to jail, $1.50.

The justice of the peace before whom the violator was tried received $3.45 for costs of the trial in his court.

Nov. 1, 1929

Windshield thief has to pay a $200 fine

CLEARWATER — Auto windshields were very expensive for Walter Florey, 18, of St. Petersburg. One of the glasses which sold for only $40 when it came out of the garage new, bright and shiny, would cost Florey a $200 fine or six months in jail, and the one he got was second-hand.

Florey saw another car parked at the curbside with a windshield just like the one he wanted. He took a monkey wrench, removed it and placed it on his car.

Arresting officers found the windshield, which fit the car exactly, installed on Florey's car.

It turned out to be the property of W.S. Stratton of St. Petersburg, who suffered the loss of his windshield while enjoying a movie in a Sunshine City showhouse. He had parked his car in the vicinity of the Capitol theater.

Florey admitted his guilt when brought before County Judge Harry R. Hewitt here this morning. Hewitt fixed the fine and announced to "aspiring thieves" that they will stand little chance of being "favored with a fine." If they are found guilty, they would, in all probability, be sent to jail.

Headlines through the years

A look back at the events, people and places that made North Pinellas the unique place that it is. The information is compiled from past editions of the St. Petersburg Times.



>>looking back

Headlines through

the years

A look back at the events, people and places that made North Pinellas the unique place that it is. The information is compiled from past editions of the St. Petersburg Times.

Radio system tracks Truman-Dewey results 11/01/08 [Last modified: Wednesday, November 3, 2010 6:14pm]
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