Restoring marine habitat with 36 tons of oyster shells

Tampa Bay Watch volunteer Frank Gallant (far left) grabs the next 35-pound bag of oyster shells as Pat Schmieg steadies the boat from the railing while (from second from left) Larry Binder, Andy Lykens, Sydney Alhale, Grover Griffin and Serra Herndon work together to build an oyster bar at Maximo Park in St. Petersburg on Thursday, October 8, 2015. About 20 Tampa Bay Watch volunteers shoveled fossilized shell into mesh bags which were transported by boat to the project site. The team then placed the oyster shell bags on the shoreline to form a 300-foot long bar, which helps restore lost habitat systems to the bay, prevents further erosion of the shoreline and improves water quality. Tampa Bay Watch Environmental Scientist Andy Lykens said they will make a 300-foot oyster bar, using over 36 tons of oyster shells. The project continues Friday and Saturday. [LARA CERRI  |   Times]
Tampa Bay Watch volunteer Frank Gallant (far left) grabs the next 35-pound bag of oyster shells as Pat Schmieg steadies the boat from the railing while (from second from left) Larry Binder, Andy Lykens, Sydney Alhale, Grover Griffin and Serra Herndon work together to build an oyster bar at Maximo Park in St. Petersburg on Thursday, October 8, 2015. About 20 Tampa Bay Watch volunteers shoveled fossilized shell into mesh bags which were transported by boat to the project site. The team then placed the oyster shell bags on the shoreline to form a 300-foot long bar, which helps restore lost habitat systems to the bay, prevents further erosion of the shoreline and improves water quality. Tampa Bay Watch Environmental Scientist Andy Lykens said they will make a 300-foot oyster bar, using over 36 tons of oyster shells. The project continues Friday and Saturday. [LARA CERRI | Times]
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Tampa Bay Watch volunteers stacked 35-pound bags of oyster shells to form an oyster bar at Maximo Park this morning.

About 20 Tampa Bay Watch volunteers shoveled fossilized shell into mesh bags that were transported by boat to the project site. The team then placed the oyster shell bags on the shoreline to form a 300-foot long bar, which helps restore lost habitat systems to the bay, prevents further erosion of the shoreline and improves water quality.

The group expects to move about 36 tons of shells over the three-day project.

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