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Soccer player Stacey Swezey of Hudson High is ready for college scouts

Stacey Swezey clears a ball off the end line for the Hudson U18/19 Lady Cobras in a recent game against the East Pasco Soccer Club. Swezey will be looking to use the team’s upcoming title defense at the Orange Classic to gain the attention of college scouts.

Photo by David Rice

Stacey Swezey clears a ball off the end line for the Hudson U18/19 Lady Cobras in a recent game against the East Pasco Soccer Club. Swezey will be looking to use the team’s upcoming title defense at the Orange Classic to gain the attention of college scouts.

HUDSON — Two years ago, Stacey Swezey doubted whether she could play soccer after tearing the anterior cruciate ligament.

Today she is considering which college she wants to play for.

The Hudson High and U18/19 Hudson Lady Cobras captain spent the year before last rehabbing the knee injury that she sustained during a scrimmage against a Cobra boys team.

"I felt that I tweaked it and it turned out that I tore my ACL and meniscus and had to have it repaired," Swezey said. "It took six months to get back, and to be honest, it's been two years since it happened and I wasn't a hundred percent until about five months ago. It's like your muscles don't remember how to do anything, so I had to teach myself to kick the ball all over again."

Now Swezey is playing well enough that she is hoping to gain the interest of college scouts. With her senior season on the horizon and the Orange Classic in December, Swezey is primed to grab the attention of anyone watching.

"Last year, my high school did well with districts and my club team did well to win the Orange Classic," Swezey said.

She hopes to see some scouts at some of her tournaments this year.

"I'll settle for any school — I just want to play," Swezey said.

Hudson High coach Stephen Jones has been a friend of Swezey's family since her early days as a competitive player. He has seen her grow on the field over the years and believes she has what it takes to play at the next level.

"I definitely think that Stacey has the drive and determination to make it in college," Jones said. "She's been polishing her skills her whole life, and she has a lot of perseverance, so I think she'll be fine."

If any school out there has an advantage in scouting Swezey it would have to be Flagler College. Swezey's former teammate and close friend Lindsay Dullo plays forward for the Saints and would love to see her friend join her.

"Her style of play is very passionate," Dullo said. "That's what makes her stand out amongst players her age. She's dedicated and an all-around good teammate. That's part of the reason I want her to come to Flagler."

For the 18-year-old Swezey, the prospect of playing in college is the only thing that matters.

"Playing in college is different because everyone is playing because they're serious about soccer," Swezey said. "Soccer is my passion. It's what I do, so I want to go on and do it. There's a professional women's league again so you never know where you could end up if you work your magic in front of the right people."

FAST FACTS

Stacey Swezey

Age: 18

School: Hudson High School

Grade: Senior

Position: Midfielder/defender

Note: Swezey has played in Hudson since age 6. Her father is the coach of her U18/19 Lady Cobras team. Swezey is going to guest play in a tournament in Raleigh, N.C., later this year and in the Orange Classic again with her team at the end of the year. She will most likely play outside back or sweeper for her high school team this season, said coach Stephen Jones.

Soccer player Stacey Swezey of Hudson High is ready for college scouts 10/29/09 [Last modified: Thursday, October 29, 2009 6:18pm]
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