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Sugar Bowl watch party with Rockin' Road Show will benefit boy with brain tumor

WESLEY CHAPEL — Kirsten Joyer is right about her two sons, Kamran and Hunter, playing opposite each other in Wednesday's Allstate Sugar Bowl.

"A Joyer will win," the retired assistant principal of Weightman Middle School said when asked about the Florida-Louisville matchup that will pit Kamran, an offensive lineman for the Cardinals, against his younger brother, a fullback for the Gators.

But the real winner will be one of Joyer's former students, Aaron Klingebiel, a 13-year-old being treated for a malignant brain tumor.

The eighth-grader will be the beneficiary of a special watch party being sponsored by Kirsten Joyer's new online radio team, the Rockin' Roadshow.

"Our main purpose of the broadcast is to raise money for local charities," said Howie Taylor, whose on-air name is Howie Dewitt (pronounced Howie Do-it.)

"The game is near and dear to Kirsten, and we decided to do it as the fundraiser for January."

Beef 'O' Brady's owners Gary and Michelle Bailey have agreed to donate 15 percent of all food sales from 6 p.m. to closing to help Aaron, who underwent surgery a year ago and is still undergoing treatment. Kickoff is at 8:30 p.m.

"He's still getting treatment and his family is still racking up medical bills," Taylor said.

During the game, emcees Dewitt and Dave "Flash" Morgan, who also works as a disc jockey at WRBQ-FM's Saturday Night Dance Party, will give away prize baskets donated by local businesses.

"They'll either be raffled or auctioned," Taylor said.

Rockin' Roadshow personality Joyer, known as "Kirstie" on the show, is expected to join in by phone or webcam. She'll be sitting on the Gator side of Mercedes-Benz Superdome, while her husband, Jack, will be on Cardinals side. About 20 relatives will be with them.

Joyer, who retired from Weightman after suffering a near-fatal aneurysm at school in 2010, joined the radio group after a chance encounter with Taylor at a nightclub, where she was singing with her band, Mainstream.

"She was my kids' assistant principal," he said. "It took us a minute to figure out who the other was."

He said Joyer brings a much needed feminine perspective to the show, which broadcasts for two hours each week and can be seen online.

"It was mainly a guy show," he said. The other member is Bobby "Lucky 13" Waite, a plumber at James A. Haley VA Medical Center in Tampa. Taylor is a web developer for cell phones and tablets.

Joyer said it was tough not being able to return to her job at school.

"I used to see a school bus and just burst into tears," she said. "This radio show has given me a new life and a purpose."

Morgan started the show after being laid off at WRBQ. The station has since rehired him part time. It used to run live out of Radio Bar and Grill, but the crew has since built its own studio, known on the show as the "secret bunker."

"We've pretty much been the four amigos," Taylor said. "We're a funny crew and a pretty cool mix."

.if you go

Party's on

What: Joyer Bowl Watch Party to benefit Aaron Klingebiel, a Weightman Middle School student battling a brain tumor.

When: 6 p.m.

Where: Beef 'O' Brady's, 7311 Wesley Chapel Blvd.

Contact: (813) 994-1511

Visit www.rockinroadshow.com to hear the radio show.

Sugar Bowl watch party with Rockin' Road Show will benefit boy with brain tumor 12/28/12 [Last modified: Friday, December 28, 2012 8:17pm]
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