Friday, June 22, 2018
News Roundup

Libya warnings were plentiful, but unspecific

WASHINGTON — In the months leading up to the Sept. 11 attacks on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, the Obama administration received intelligence reports that Islamic extremist groups were operating training camps in the mountains near the Libyan city and that some of the fighters were "al-Qaida-leaning," the New York Times reported Monday, citing unnamed U.S. and European officials.

The warning about the camps was part of a stream of diplomatic and intelligence reports that indicated that the security situation throughout the country, and particularly in eastern Libya, had deteriorated sharply since the United States reopened its embassy in Tripoli after the fall of Moammar Gadhafi's government in September 2011, the newspaper reported.

It said that by June, Benghazi had experienced a string of assassinations as well as attacks on the Red Cross and a British envoy's motorcade. Ambassador Christopher Stevens, who was among four Americans killed in the September attack, emailed his superiors in Washington in August alerting them to "a security vacuum" in the city. A week before Stevens died, the U.S. Embassy warned that Libyan officials had declared a "state of maximum alert" in Benghazi after a car bombing and thwarted bank robbery, according to the newspaper.

In the closing weeks of the presidential campaign, the circumstances surrounding the attack on the Benghazi compound have emerged as a major political issue, as Republicans, led by presidential nominee Mitt Romney, have sought to lay blame for the attack on President Barack Obama, who they argued had insufficiently protected U.S. lives there.

But the New York Times reported that interviews with U.S. officials and an examination of State Department documents do not reveal the kind of smoking gun Republicans have suggested would emerge in the attack's aftermath such as a warning that the consulate would be targeted.

The newspaper said what is clear is that even as the State Department responded to the June attacks, crowning the Benghazi compound walls with concertina wire and setting up concrete barriers to thwart car bombs, it remained committed to a security strategy formulated in a different environment a year earlier.

In the early days after the fall of Gadhafi's government, the administration's plan was to deploy a modest U.S. security force and then increasingly rely on trained Libyan personnel to protect U.S. diplomats — a policy that reflected White House apprehensions about putting combat troops on the ground as well as Libyan sensitivities about an obtrusive U.S. troop presence, the newspaper reported.

But the question on the minds of some lawmakers is why the declining security situation did not prompt a rethinking of the security needs by the State Department and the White House. Three investigations in Congress and a State Department inquiry are examining the attack, which U.S. officials said included participants from Ansar al-Shariah, al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb and the Muhammad Jamal network, a group in Egypt.

"Given the large number of attacks that had occurred in Benghazi that were aimed at Western targets, it is inexplicable to me that security wasn't increased," said Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, the senior Republican on the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, a panel holding inquiries.

Defending their preparations, State Department officials have asserted that there was no specific intelligence that warned of a large-scale attack on the diplomatic compound in Benghazi, which they asserted was unprecedented. The department said it was careful to weigh security with diplomats' need to meet with Libyan officials and citizens.

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