Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Eight candidates vying to manage Zephyrhills Municipal Airport

ZEPHYRHILLS — More than a year after its airport manager was fired, the city is a step closer to filling the position permanently.

Advertising for the position recently closed with eight applicants, said City Manager Jim Drumm, who expects to start interviewing candidates for the position within a couple of weeks.

Among them is Nathan Coleman, who has been interim airport manager since Trina Sweet, who held the position for about five years, was fired by then City Manager Steve Spina last March. Coleman, a licensed pilot, was transferred to the position from his regular city job as water division supervisor.

While Drumm says Coleman has done a good job filling in, he opened the search to both internal and external candidates as he historically has done in other cities to make sure the city gets the best person in the role.

"There's not judgment to that," Drumm said.

Coleman has consistently been praised by council members during meetings when he has easily been able to answer their questions about the Zephyrhills Municipal Airport operations and about aviation.

"I think he's done an excellent job. He went into a situation where he didn't have a lot of knowledge," council member Lance Smith said Friday. "He went in there and learned a lot and tied up a lot of loose ends."

Still, Smith said, he agrees with the city manager that it's best to open it up to all candidates, but he hopes to keep Coleman around.

"All I know is he's an excellent employee and we need to have him in the city in some capacity," Smith said.

This airport manager is responsible for administration and general day-to-day operations of the city-owned airport, its budget, revenue generation and maintenance, as well as capital improvements and development and more. Pay for the position starts around $52,400 annually and the manager reports to the city manager.

The new manager will be coming in at a critical time in the airport's history. The airport is in the midst of major repairs and upgrades and the area in and around it are a main target of the city's redevelopment efforts.

Drumm will make the decision alone and expects to have someone permanently in place by the end of May.

Eight candidates vying to manage Zephyrhills Municipal Airport 04/06/12 [Last modified: Friday, April 6, 2012 7:22pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Tampa Bay Times journalists wins 17 Green Eyeshade Awards

    Human Interest

    Tampa Bay Times journalists placed first in seven categories of the prestigious Green Eyeshade awards, which honors outstanding journalism in the Southeast.

  2. What you need to know for Tuesday, May 23

    News

    Catching you up on overnight happenings, and what you need to know today.

    A manatee swims near the entrance to Three Sisters Springs on Kings Bay, some of many springs that feed the Crystal River in Citrus County. The Southwest Florida Water Management District is considering a proposal that would allow a decrease to the amount of fresh water flowing in the Crystal River so that water can be diverted to fuel development. Critics say similar proposals around the state could threaten Florida's environmental health. [DOUGLAS R. CLIFFORD | Times (2014]
  3. Ailing Florida springs could be tapped further to fuel development

    Water

    BROOKSVILLE — Efforts by state officials to set a minimum flow for its iconic springs have stirred up a wave of public opposition. Opponents contend the state is willing to destroy its springs in order to justify continuing to provide water for new development.

    A manatee swims near the entrance to Three Sisters Springs on Kings Bay, one of many springs that feeds the Crystal River in Citrus County. The Southwest Florida Water Management District is considering a proposal to decrease the amount of fresh water flowing in Crystal River so that water can be diverted to fuel development. Critics say similar proposals around the state could threaten Florida's environmental health. [DOUGLAS R. CLIFFORD | Times (2014
  4. Canned by lawmakers, PTC staff say they are now forgotten

    Transportation

    TAMPA — After roughly 20 years in the Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office, Mike Gonzalez got another job with a uniform and badge when he was hired in 2015 as an inspector for the Public Transportation Commission.

    The badge that PTC inspectors carry while on duty. State lawmakers voted to abolish the agency this year leaving its remaining employees fearing for their future.
  5. Ferries from Florida not a priority for Cuban government

    Tourism

    Cruises and commercial flights now link Tampa and Havana, but before the U.S. government approved either for such journeys, ferries had the nod.

    Baja Ferries was among a handful of companies the U.S. government approved to service Cuba two years ago.
But Cuba's ambassador to the United States recently said the wait may be long. Ferries are not a high priority for Cuba.
This is an example of one of the overnight passenger ferries the  Baja Ferries wanted  to use to reach Cuba from Florida.


Photo Credit: Baja Ferries USA LLC