Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Proposed spending plan includes lower tax rate

NEW PORT RICHEY — A slightly lower tax rate and fewer city employees.

That's the abbreviated version of the proposed $40.3-million spending plan that New Port Richey administrators presented to the City Council on Tuesday night.

The proposed budget calls for a tax rate of 6.7 mills, about 0.08 lower than the rate used in the current fiscal year. Overall spending is down 8 percent from the current fiscal year. City Manager Tom O'Neill attributes the decrease to reductions in staff, liability and property insurance, capital construction costs and allocations to the reserve funds.

No city workers are losing their jobs, but officials have decided against filling a number of positions left open because of retirements and resignations.

Those include some supervisory positions in the police and fire departments as well as positions in the library and the parks and recreation, public works and redevelopment departments.

Attrition will only work for so long, though, said O'Neill. He told the council in a letter that if it decides during upcoming budget meetings to increase any services, "then the City Council will be faced with making budget cuts that will most certainly involve additional staff reductions."

Like other Pasco cities, New Port Richey saw a big drop in its tax base after tax reform legislation. New Port Richey's tax base declined to $817-million, roughly 11 percent lower than it is in the current year.

The impact of a smaller tax base and lower millage rate translates into a $723,340 decrease in general fund revenue. The tax base decrease also has implications for the redevelopment fund, which gets revenue from both the city and county: It will get $496,000 less from the city and $373,240 less from Pasco County.

The City Council will begin its discussions of the proposed plan next Tuesday.

Jodie Tillman can be reached at jtillman@sptimes.com or (727) 869-6247.

Proposed spending plan includes lower tax rate 07/01/08 [Last modified: Wednesday, July 2, 2008 1:04pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Gov. Rick Scott appoints 'my friend' Jimmy Patronis as state chief financial officer

    Blogs

    Gov. Rick Scott on Monday appointed a long-time friend and political supporter, Jimmy Patronis, to replace Jeff Atwater as Florida's next chief financial officer, making him one of three members of the Cabinet that sets state policy on …

    Rick Scott appoints Jimmy Patronis (background) as CFO
  2. Officially official: Malik Zaire, Jake Fruhmorgen join Florida Gators

    Blogs

    It's finally, officially official: Malik Zaire has joined the Florida Gators.

  3. Support for gay marriage surges, even among groups once wary

    Nation

    NEW YORK — In the two years since same-sex marriage was legalized nationwide, support for it has surged even among groups that recently were broadly opposed, according to a new national survey.

    People gather in Washington's Lafayette Park to see the White House lit up in rainbow colors on June 26, 2015, the day the Supreme Court ruled that same-sex marriage legal. In the two years since same-sex marriage was legalized nationwide, support for it has surged even among groups that recently were broadly opposed, according to a new national survey released on Monday, June 26, 2017. [Associated Press]
  4. June 26 marks the 20th anniversary of the Harry Potter series.
  5. Air bag recalls, lawsuits lead Takata to file for bankruptcy

    Autos

    Shattered by recall costs and lawsuits, Japanese air bag maker Takata Corp. filed Monday for bankruptcy protection in Tokyo and the U.S., saying it was the only way it could keep on supplying replacements for faulty air bag inflators linked to the deaths of at least 16 people.

    Japanese air bag maker Takata Corp. CEO Shigehisa Takada bows during a press conference in Tokyo on Monday. Takata has filed for bankruptcy protection in Tokyo and the U.S., overwhelmed by lawsuits and recall costs related to its production of defective air bag inflators.
[(AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi]