Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Tampa mayor wants some workers to return raises

TAMPA — When the City Council approved Mayor Pam Iorio's budget last month, it included no money for raises.

But with contract negotiations with police, fire and general employee unions stalled, a handful of employees will get pay increases because terms of the existing contracts, which expired Thursday, remain in place.

The pay increases would be given to employees on the anniversary of their hiring.

Iorio, though, says she wants those employees to give the money back to the city if the final contracts include no raises.

It wouldn't be fair if some people got raises and others didn't simply because of the timing of contract approvals, she said.

In a letter to the City Council this week, Iorio said any final contract should include the payback provision. "The proposed remedy is endorsed by both our City Attorney and Labor Attorney," Iorio wrote.

Union leaders, though, question the legitimacy of the stance.

"Attorneys are checking into the legality of that," said Martha Stevens, president of the Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1464, which represents about 2,000 employees.

It's more than likely an unfair labor practice, said Greg Stout, head of the Tampa Police Benevolent Association, which represents 985 employees. "I don't think they can do it."

The unions have generally agreed to forgo cost-of-living increases this year.

But the police and fire unions still want so-called step increases, which are based on years of service and growing responsibility.

City officials have said a year's worth of merit and step increases would cost the city $4.5 million and force mass layoffs.

The city declared an impasse on contract negotiations this summer. That means they need to go before a special magistrate, who will issue a nonbinding opinion. If the two sides don't accept the magistrate's ruling, the contracts will go to the City Council.

So far, only the police contract has gone to the magistrate.

Stout said it's possible the two sides will come to an agreement without the council, but Iorio said she expects the contract will end up in front of the board in mid November.

After approving the budget last month, the council sent a letter to employees letting them know that the current budget doesn't include money for raises.

"It is in the best interest of all involved to recognize the present economic realities," the letter reads. "We strongly encourage the bargaining agents for the unions to renew their efforts to find a mutually acceptable resolution within the constraints of the budget approved by council."

Stout, though, said he doesn't see that letter as an indication that the council will reject step increases. "We've spoken to all but one City Council person and not one has made an outright claim that they plan on voting against us," he said. "We've had several positive comments from at least three City Council people."

Tampa mayor wants some workers to return raises 10/02/09 [Last modified: Friday, October 2, 2009 11:06pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Outback Steakhouse sees growth in U.S. and Brazil markets in second quarter

    Retail

    TAMPA — Restaurant sales were up at Outback Steakhouse and Carrabba's Italian Grill during the second quarter of 2017, but Bonefish Grill continues to lag at Tampa-based Bloomin' Brands.

    The Outback Steakhouse, on 4088 Park St. N, is showin on July 26, 2017. Restaurant sales were up at Outback Steakhouse  and Carrabba's Italian Grill during the second quarter of 2017, but Bonefish Grill continues to lag at Tampa-based Bloomin' Brands. [SCOTT KEELER | Times]
  2. Florida education news: #HB7069 lawsuits, budgets, teacher's union tussle and more

    Blogs

    #HB7069 LAWSUIT: The tally of Florida school boards taking legal action against the state has risen to five. On Tuesday three school boards from Bay, The Pinellas County School Board meets in August 2015 at district headquarters in Largo.

  3. Brooksville man threatens couple with samurai sword in road rage incident

    Crime

    BROOKSVILLE — A Brooksville man is facing multiple charges after he threatened to kill a couple with a samurai sword during a road rage incident Tuesday afternoon, according to the Brooksville Police Department.

    Daniel Franklin Seymour, 43, of Brooksville, is facing multiple charges after he threatened to kill a couple with a samurai sword that he pulled out of his vehicle in a road rage incident Tuesday afternoon, according to the Brooksville Police Department.
  4. Parents of Plant High cheerleader urge others to learn from her death by heroin overdose

    Crime

    TAMPA — Since their youngest daughter died from an overdose of heroin, just weeks before her high school graduation, Dawn and Cliff Golden have searched desperately for something to do about it.

    Devastated at the death of daughter Katie from a heroin overdose, Cliff and Dawn Golden have gotten busy to turn the tragedy to good. Among their causes is aiding a new organization that works to make teens comfortable seeking help for mental health problems. [ALESSANDRA DA PRA  |   Times]
  5. Survey shows employees praise, fear Hernando School Superintendent Romano

    Education

    BROOKSVILLE — Two years after Hernando school district leaders suggested an employee-based evaluation of Superintendent Lori Romano, the results — showing feedback both positive and not so — are now public.

    
Hernando County School District Superintendent Lori Romano received an  evulation from people she supervises during a school board workshop Tuesday. In the survey, employees both praised and criticized her performance. She is shown here in a workshop three years ago as she was completing her first year in the job.