Tuesday, September 18, 2018
Military News

Pentagon investigating troubling questions after deadly Niger ambush

WASHINGTON — Defense Secretary James N. Mattis, troubled by a lack of information two weeks after an ambush on a special operations patrol in Niger left four U.S. soldiers dead, is demanding a timeline of what is known about the attack, as a team of investigators sent to West Africa begins its work.

The growing list of unanswered questions and inability to construct a precise account of the Oct. 4 incident has exacerbated a public relations nightmare for the White House, which is now embroiled in controversy over President Donald Trump’s belated and seemingly clumsy response this week to console grieving military families.

"We need to find out what happened and why," White House Chief of Staff John F. Kelly, whose son was killed in Afghanistan in 2010, told reporters at the White House on Thursday.

At the Pentagon, Mattis suggested to reporters that he would say little pending results of the investigation. "We at the Department of Defense like to know what we’re talking about before we talk," he said. "And so we don’t have all the accurate information yet. We will release it as rapidly as we get it."

The attack, apparently carried out by armed militants affiliated with the Islamic State, was the deadliest since Trump took office, yet the U.S. military’s Africa Command still does not have a clear "story board" of facts that commanders usually gather swiftly after deadly incidents. That has senior Pentagon officials and lawmakers suggesting incompetence.

The questions arising from the incident, particularly about the availability of additional military support to the patrol, echo those raised in the aftermath of the 2012 Benghazi attack in Libya, which resulted in the deaths of four people: U.S. Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens, foreign service information officer Sean Smith, and CIA contractors Glen Doherty and Tyrone Woods.

Sen. John McCain, an Arizona Republican and chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said on Thursday that getting to the bottom of what happened may require subpoenas.

"That’s why we’re called the Senate Armed Services Committee," he said. "It’s because we have oversight of our military. So we deserve to have all the information."

Comments
Howard Altman: Tampa World War II veteran turning 100 recalls guarding prisoners then celebs

Howard Altman: Tampa World War II veteran turning 100 recalls guarding prisoners then celebs

Frank Sorbera was a band boy for the Russ Morgan Orchestra, lugging equipment and driving vehicles, all the while hoping to one day join the big band outfit as a singer.But it was 1944, World War II was grinding on and Uncle Sam had other plans for t...
Published: 09/13/18
Updated: 09/14/18
Saved by a hunk of marble, Trinity man recalls harrowing escape from World Trade Center

Saved by a hunk of marble, Trinity man recalls harrowing escape from World Trade Center

TAMPA — Shortly before 9 a.m. on a beautiful morning 17 years ago, Greg Amira was making his way up to his office on the 73rd floor in the south tower of the World Trade Center.He felt the building shake."I assumed Building No. 1 was hit," Amira said...
Published: 09/11/18
Updated: 09/12/18
Experts say it’s likely Cuba embassy workers were sickened by ‘directed energy’ weapons

Experts say it’s likely Cuba embassy workers were sickened by ‘directed energy’ weapons

There is a "high probability" that U.S. embassy workers sickened in Cuba in late 2016 were attacked by a "directed energy" weapon, a biochemistry expert told officials from U.S. Special Operations Command and its Ybor City-based incubator partner Sof...
Published: 09/06/18
Updated: 09/07/18
World War II nurse, turning 100 in Tampa, recalls the pain of invisible wounds

World War II nurse, turning 100 in Tampa, recalls the pain of invisible wounds

TAMPA — During her time as an Army nurse in World War II, treating the wounded in North Africa, Normandy and the Ardennes Forest, Martha Cameron proved to be a pioneer in more ways than one.One of the first women to land in France after D-day, part o...
Published: 09/05/18
Updated: 09/06/18
SOCom is asking to see all kinds of drones, some for delivering blood to the battlefield

SOCom is asking to see all kinds of drones, some for delivering blood to the battlefield

On a far-flung battlefield, 100 miles from the nearest treatment center, a Navy corpsman signals for a small drone to bring life-saving blood to a wounded commando.Meanwhile, a tiny drone shaped like a bug spies on enemy leaders. Another small drone ...
Published: 09/04/18
Howard Altman: Carrollwood veteran gets hero’s welcome retrieving dog tags from Normandy

Howard Altman: Carrollwood veteran gets hero’s welcome retrieving dog tags from Normandy

Nearly 75 years after first coming ashore in France as a young Army soldier, Boris Stern returned this summer to offer thanks to those who helped return his long-lost dog tag.He arrived to a hero’s welcome."I’ve been all over the world," said Stern, ...
Updated one month ago
Paralyzed veteran finishes fund-raising wheelchair ride from New York to Pinellas Park

Paralyzed veteran finishes fund-raising wheelchair ride from New York to Pinellas Park

TAMPA — A paralyzed veteran has finished a two-week, $1,500 fund-raising ride that started in New York, setting out from Tampa at 9 a.m. today in his hand-crank cycle and reaching the finish line in Pinellas Park just before 1 p,m,Ricky Raley is rais...
Updated one month ago
Update: Reader recognizes name of Vietnam casualty — and has a better photo

Update: Reader recognizes name of Vietnam casualty — and has a better photo

David Loeb read the paper on Saturday, and a story took him back to 1967, to boot camp at Parris Island, to one of the other Marines in his platoon.At his Clearwater apartment, Loeb pulled out an old yearbook and searched for Ruben Bell Jr.’s picture...
Updated one month ago