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Defense contractor SAIC says it could lay off 200 in Tampa

Defense contractor Science Applications International Corp. has tentative plans to lay off 200 workers at its operations at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa this fall if it does not get a contract renewal.

The layoffs will be effective Sept. 21, according to a notice filed with the state this week.

In a letter to state officials, SAIC executives indicated the company is "optimistic" about winning the contract through U.S. Central Command at MacDill as it is the incumbent, but it is required by law to warn about the prospect of layoffs.

SAIC, which is based in McLean, Va., is heavily involved in providing scientific, engineering systems integration and other technical services to the government. All told, it has about 40,000 employees and $10.6 billion in annual revenues though contracts involving the U.S. Department of Defense, the intelligence community, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and other government civil agencies.

A spokesman for SAIC could not be immediately reached Thursday morning to give more details.

Note: An earlier version of this story based on the state filing indicated layoffs were certain.

Defense contractor SAIC says it could lay off 200 in Tampa 08/02/12 [Last modified: Thursday, August 2, 2012 2:38pm]
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