Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Mystery surrounding U.S. Navy Veterans director Bobby Thompson grows

In 2006, Ohio politician Betty Montgomery reported a $500 contribution to her 2006 campaign for attorney general from U.S. Navy Veterans director Bobby C. Thompson. His address was listed at 934 Smiley Ave., Cincinnati.

A Bobby Thompson did live there, just not Bobby C. Thompson. It was Bobby no-middle-initial Thompson, a 67-year-old retired metalworker who says he lived in that Smiley Avenue house with his wife, Ernestine, during all of 2006, but he never wrote a campaign check to anyone.

"I ain't never been in the Army, ain't never been in the Navy, ain't never been in the Air Force, ain't never been in the Marines, and I don't make contributions,'' he said. "And I have a problem with this."

Now Ohio Attorney General Richard Cordray has taken notice of the questionable campaign check as his office continues its investigation into the Navy Veterans group and its founder, Bobby C. Thompson.

Calling the group "illegitimate from the get-go,'' Cordray has shut down the Navy Veterans nonprofit in Ohio and has asked a judge to freeze its bank accounts. He said there is little evidence that the $1.9 million the group reported getting from Ohio residents since 2003 was used to help veterans.

Montgomery was Ohio Attorney General from 1995 to 2003 and was running for that office again in 2006 when her campaign reported Bobby C. Thompson's $500 check.

She lost that election and now works at Mac Murray, Petersen & Shuster, the law firm that represented the Navy Veterans until this week. Helen Mac Murray had been general counsel for the Navy Veterans since last June. While Montgomery was attorney general, Mac Murray was chief of Montgomery's Consumer Protection section.

Neither Montgomery nor Mac Murray responded to requests for comment.

Tax returns show that the Navy Veterans made a few cash grants in Ohio during 2008 and 2009, including $1,000 to the city of Columbus to assist needy veterans, $1,899 to the Columbus mayor's community prayer luncheon and $1,800 to CET-TV, a public broadcasting station in Cincinnati.

CET station manager Jack Dominic said Thompson called him out of the blue and offered to send the $1,800 to sponsor a TV series. Later, the Navy Veterans website featured a thank-you from CET that said, "Thank you so much for the good work you do for veterans here in the Cincinnati area... God bless you!"

Dominic said his station did send a general thank you note to Thompson's group, but he said the note was altered to make it look like the station was thanking the group for doing good deeds for Cincinnati veterans.

"We have no idea what he was doing for veterans in Cincinnati,'' Dominic said this week. "I sent him a letter asking them to delete that quote, but I'm not expecting to hear back any time soon."

Mystery surrounding U.S. Navy Veterans director Bobby Thompson grows 07/14/10 [Last modified: Thursday, July 15, 2010 11:06am]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. What was Rays RF Steven Souza Jr. thinking on that comically bad dive?

    Blogs

    What could Rays RF Steven Souza Jr. been thinking in the seventh inning Friday when he dove for a ball and came up yards short?

    Actually, he insisted after all the laughing, teasing and standing ovation from the Twins fans was done, it was a matter of self-preservation.

  2. Judge tosses life sentences for D.C. sniper Lee Boyd Malvo

    Nation

    McLEAN, Va. — A federal judge on Friday tossed out two life sentences for one of Virginia's most notorious criminals, sniper Lee Boyd Malvo, and ordered Virginia courts to hold new sentencing hearings.

    A federal judge has tossed out two life sentences for D.C. sniper shooter Lee Boyd Malvo. [Associated Press, 2004]
  3. Zbigniew Brzezinski, President Carter's national security adviser, dies

    News

    Zbigniew Brzezinski, the hawkish strategic theorist who was national security adviser to President Jimmy Carter in the tumultuous years of the Iran hostage crisis and the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in the late 1970s, died on Friday at a hospital in Virginia. He was 89.

    Zbigniew Brzezinski, former national security adviser to President Jimmy Carter, participates in Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on Capitol Hill on March 5, 2009, in Washington, D.C. [Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images]
  4. USF eliminated by UCF in AAC baseball; Florida, FSU, Miami win

    Colleges

    CLEARWATER — Roughly 16 hours after a ninth-inning collapse against East Carolina in the American Athletic Conference's double-elimination baseball tournament, USF returned to Spectrum Field presumably set for a reboot.

    It simply got booted instead.

    ’NOLES win: Tyler Holton gets a hug from Drew Carlton after his strong eight innings help Florida State beat Louisville.
  5. Pinellas licensing board executive director settled hundreds of cases without getting his board's approval

    Local Government

    By Mark Puente

    Times Staff Writer

    Eleanor Morrison complained to the Pinellas licensing board in 2015 that her contractor installed crooked walls and windows and poured too much concrete for her carport.

    Eleanor Morrison poses at her home in Treasure Island, 5/26/17. Morrison filed a complaint with the Pinellas County Construction Licensing Board and later learned that its former Executive Director, Rodney Fischer, dismissed the case in a private meeting with the contractor.