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Morning Watch: Next steps for travel ban; Syrian refugees can't find homes; why more people are leaving the U.S.; big houses irk St. Pete residents

Amin Alsaloum plays on the floor with daughter Jamila Alsaloum (left) and son Ahmad Alsaloum at their temporary apartment in Tampa. Much of the Alsaloum family's motivation for fleeing Syria was to find safety for the children in a country where they could grow up to find success. LOREN ELLIOTT | Times

Amin Alsaloum plays on the floor with daughter Jamila Alsaloum (left) and son Ahmad Alsaloum at their temporary apartment in Tampa. Much of the Alsaloum family's motivation for fleeing Syria was to find safety for the children in a country where they could grow up to find success. LOREN ELLIOTT | Times

The latest news and developments to help you get ready for the day ahead.

APPEALS COURT REJECTION LEAVES TRUMP TRAVEL BAN ON HOLD

The legal fight over President Donald Trump's ban on travelers from seven predominantly Muslim nations is on hold after the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals declined to block a lower-court ruling that suspended the ban, allowing previously barred travelers to continue coming to the United States. It is unclear what Trump's next move will be. Here's a look at what's next in the travel ban case.

SYRIAN REFUGEES STRUGGLE TO FIND PERMANENT HOMES IN TAMPA BAY AREA

There was a time when Amira Salama would pick up a Syrian refugee family from Tampa International Airport and drive them directly to a leased apartment, complete with donated furniture, clothes and food. The donations are still coming, says Salama, executive director of the Clearwater-based non-profit Coptic Orthodox Charities, which resettles refugees in the Tampa Bay area. But finding them a place to live has become a struggle in recent months. At times, refugees are here for weeks before they can find somewhere permanent.

ST. PETERSBURG EYES ZONING CHANGES AFTER EXPLOSION OF LARGE HOMES

[SCOTT KEELER | Times]

Several large houses are under construction on Monterey Boulevard NE in Snell Isle where smaller homes stood before.

You know all those gargantuan homes popping up around St. Petersburg? Residents aren't too happy about them, and city officials are considering changes to help the behemoths better fit in.

A POTENTIALLY HISTORIC NUMBER OF PEOPLE ARE GIVING UP THEIR U.S. CITIZENSHIP. BUT LIKELY NOT OVER TRUMP.

It can be difficult to become a U.S. citizen. A lot of people put a large amount of time, effort and money into the process of gaining an American passport or, failing that, the right to permanent residency. But to some people, U.S. citizenship can apparently be a burden. And it's a burden that people seem to be shaking off in increasing numbers. The reasons might surprise you.

FEE, WHO SET TONE FOR TEMPLE TERRACE AS MAYOR, DEAD AT 93

Former Temple Terrace Mayor George W. Fee, known for his charm, humor and accomplishments in and out of public office, has died. He was irrepressible even in his final days, said his good friend, Gerry Curts, noting that a nurse told him she was going to take his "vitals.'' "Are you going to give them back?'' Fee asked. He died Feb. 1 at age 93.

NBA PLAYER TO REF? DIFFERENT UNIFORM, SAME PEP IN HIS STEP FOR HAYWOODE WORKMAN

[Scott Purks]

Sickles junior Bryce Workman (left) gets tremendous basketball insight from his father, Haywoode Workman, who played eight years in the NBA (between 1989 and 2000) before becoming an NBA referee in 2008. Workman is one of only three former NBA players to become an NBA referee. The other two former players are Bernie Fryer and Leon Wood.

He never did it for the money, nor the ego, nor the fame. He did it for love of the game. That's why Haywoode Workman said — while sitting in the Sickles High bleachers watching son Bryce play — that he could never see himself without basketball in his life. It's why, at a mere 6-foot-2, he stuck with it after getting drafted by the Atlanta Hawks with the 49th overall pick in 1989 — only to get cut six games into the season. And now, after his playing career is over, he remains involved as a referee.

WHAT TO WATCH THIS WEEKEND: GRAMMY AWARDS, 'THE MISSING' ON STARZ, 'THE WALKING DEAD'

The midseason premiere of The Walking Dead picks up with the Alexandria group attempting to convince the leaders of the Hilltop and the Kingdom to join in the fight against Negan. Meanwhile, it's Queen A versus Queen Bey for the 59th Grammy awards. Chelsea Tatham helps you navigate the TV schedule this weekend.

Morning Watch: Next steps for travel ban; Syrian refugees can't find homes; why more people are leaving the U.S.; big houses irk St. Pete residents 02/10/17 [Last modified: Friday, February 10, 2017 9:13am]
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    Local Government

    Tampa Bay political leaders often tout taking a regional approach to solve the region's most pressing issues. But the challenge has been getting Hillsborough and Pinellas County leaders together on the same page.

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