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16-year-old uses Internet to describe captivity

SAN DIEGO — A family friend tortured and killed a mother and 8-year old son before setting his home on fire and escaping with the mother's 16-year-old daughter, according to search warrants unsealed Wednesday.

The warrants do not describe the torture but say firefighters found the mother's body in James Lee DiMaggio's garage near a crowbar and what appeared to be blood next to her head. A dead dog was found under a sleeping bag in the garage with blood near its head.

Investigators found the child's body as they sifted through rubble.

DiMaggio and 16-year-old Hannah Anderson exchanged about 13 calls before Hannah was picked up from cheerleading practice on Aug. 4. Both phones were turned off, and the home burned several hours later.

DiMaggio, 40, was like an uncle to the children and close to the parents for nearly two decades. The warrants describe how DiMaggio took Hannah on multi-day trips, most recently to Malibu and Hollywood.

Hannah Anderson was rescued when FBI agents killed DiMaggio in the Idaho wilderness on Saturday, ending a six-day search that spanned much of the western United States and parts of Canada and Mexico. Hannah Anderson described on a social media site how she survived captivity and how she is coping with the deaths of her mother and brother.

"I wish I could go back in time and risk my life to try and save theirs. I will never forgive myself for not trying harder to save them," she wrote.

The postings, which began Monday night and stopped Tuesday night, appeared on the ask.fm social-networking site account for "Hannahbanana722" of Lakeside, the teen lived with her mother and brother. The account was disabled Wednesday.

DiMaggio was shot at least five times in the head and chest, according to authorities.

Asked if she would have preferred DiMaggio got a lifetime prison sentence instead of being killed, Hannah said, "He deserved what he got."

16-year-old uses Internet to describe captivity 08/14/13 [Last modified: Wednesday, August 14, 2013 11:20pm]
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