50 years later, Obama to honor Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream

WASHINGTON — Barack Obama was 2 years old and growing up in Hawaii when the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. Fifty years later, the nation's first black president will stand as the most high-profile example of the racial progress King espoused, delivering remarks today at a nationwide commemoration of the 1963 demonstration for jobs, economic justice and racial equality.

Obama believes his success in attaining the nation's highest political office is a testament to the dedication of King and others and that he would not be in the Oval Office if it were not for their willingness to persevere through repeated imprisonments, bomb threats and blasts from billy clubs and fire hoses.

"When you are talking about Dr. King's speech at the March on Washington, you're talking about one of the maybe five greatest speeches in American history," Obama said in a radio interview Tuesday with Tom Joyner. "And the words that he spoke at that particular moment, with so much at stake, and the way in which he captured the hopes and dreams of an entire generation I think is unmatched."

In tribute, Obama keeps a bust of King in the Oval Office and a framed copy of the program from that day when 250,000 people gathered for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Within five years, the man Obama would later identify as one of his idols was dead, assassinated in April 1968 outside a motel room in Memphis.

But King's dream didn't die with him. Many believe it came true in 2008 when Obama became the first black man Americans ever elected as their president.

"Tomorrow, just like 50 years ago, an African-American man will stand on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial and speak about civil rights and justice. But afterward, he won't visit the White House. He'll go home to the White House," Education Secretary Arne Duncan said Tuesday, speaking of his basketball buddy and boss. "That's how far this country has come. A black president is a victory that few could have imagined 50 years ago."

In today's speech, Obama will offer his personal reflections on the civil rights movement, King's speech, the progress achieved in the past 50 years and the challenges that demand attention from the next generation.

Obama will be joined at the Lincoln Memorial by former Presidents Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter, as well as Oprah Winfrey.

On TV

Today's celebration of the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington begins at 9 a.m. with a march to the Lincoln Memorial. President Obama is scheduled to speak at 3:05 p.m. News channels including Fox, CNN and MSNBC, plan live coverage.

50 years later, Obama to honor Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream 08/27/13 [Last modified: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 1:02am]

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