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$600,000 stolen from Joel Osteen's megachurch

$600K stolen from Osteen's church

Authorities are investigating after $600,000 in checks and cash was stolen from a safe at Pastor Joel Osteen's megachurch in Houston. Police spokesman Kese Smith said Tuesday $200,000 in cash and $400,000 in checks were stolen from a safe at Lakewood Church sometime between 2:30 p.m. Sunday and 8:30 a.m. Monday. More than 40,000 people attend weekly services led by Osteen, whose televised sermons reach nearly 100 countries.

FDA approves headache headband

The Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday it approved a nerve-stimulating headband as the first medical device to prevent migraine headaches. The device, called Cefaly, is a battery-powered plastic band worn across the forehead. The band emits a low electrical current to stimulate nerves associated with migraine pain. The device is designed to be used no more than 20 minutes a day by patients 18 years and older. In a study, the device reduced migraines but did not prevent them.

Obama designates 1oth monument

President Barack Obama used his executive authority Tuesday to designate his 10th national monument, a 1,665-acre nature preserve on the northern California coast. The action expands the California Coastal National Monument in Mendocino County that President Bill Clinton created in 2000. The proclamation ensures that ranching, outdoor recreation and research will continue in the area.

Times wires

$600,000 stolen from Joel Osteen's megachurch 03/11/14 [Last modified: Wednesday, March 12, 2014 12:08am]
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  1. The Iron Yard coding academy to close in St. Petersburg

    Business

    ST. PETERSBURG — The Iron Yard, a code-writing academy with a location in downtown St. Petersburg, will close for good this summer.

    Instructors (from left) Mark Dewey, Jason Perry, and Gavin Stark greet the audience at The Iron Yard, 260 1st Ave. S, in St. Petersburg during "Demo Day" Friday, Oct. 7, 2016, at The Iron Yard, which is an immersive code school that is part of a trend of trying to address the shortage of programmers.  The academy is closing this summer.  [LARA CERRI   |   Times]
  2. Florida's unemployment rate drops for fourth straight month

    Markets

    How low can Florida's unemployment go? Pretty low, according to the state's latest unemployment numbers. The Sunshine State's unemployment rate dropped to 4.1 percent for June, down from 4.3 percent in May, state officials said Friday morning.

    Florida's unemployment level dropped to 4.1 percent in June from 4.3 percent in May. |  [Times file photo]
  3. 20 great images from around the globe for July 14 to July 21

    World

    Photos of the week for July 14 - July 21: A giant sinkhole swallows homes in Florida, a desperate rescue attempt in Karachi, synchronized swimmers competing in Budapest, a rainy rugby match in Australia, a smiling O.J. Simpson in Nevada and more.

    A lobsterman's boat leaves a gentle wake as he motors out of a harbor on a foggy morning, Friday, July 21, 2017, in Boothbay, Maine. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
  4. Is sinkhole damage sinking Tampa Bay property values?

    Real Estate

    On a scale of desirability, the house for sale on Whittner Drive in Land O' Lakes would rank fairly low. It's a short sale; it sits on an unstabilized sinkhole and it's within a few miles of two houses that collapsed into a gargantuan hole July 16.

    A gated community in Hernando's Spring Hill area, Pristine Place has long been susceptible to sinkholes with nearly a third of its houses with documented sinkhole damage by 2012. Today, however, many houses with repaired sinkhole damage are selling for more than houses without any issues. [WILL VRAGOVIC   |   Times file photo]
  5. Disabled Tampa man takes his story to center of health care debate

    National

    Michael Phillips was hunting demons Monday night when the news broke: The Senate health care bill was dying.

    (Left) Karen Clay, 64, operates a medical ventilator to help her son Michael Phillips, 36, breath. Michael has spinal muscular atrophy and is confined to his bed. He can breath only with the aid of a machine. Here, they are photographed at their Tampa home Wednesday, July 19, 2017. Michael and his family have been closely watching the upcoming health care vote and how it would affect them.