Wednesday, September 19, 2018
Nation & World

Searing Trump op-ed sets off wild guessing game on author

Trump fumes over NYT op-ed; top officials swiftly deny role

By ZEKE MILLER, CATHERINE LUCEY and JONATHAN LEMIRE,†Associated Press

WASHINGTON ó Pushing back against explosive reports his own administration is conspiring against him, President Donald Trump lashed out against the anonymous senior official who wrote an opinion piece in The New York Times claiming to be part of a "resistance" working "from within" to thwart the commander-in-chiefís most dangerous impulses.

Washington was consumed by a wild guessing game as to the identity of the author and swift denials of involvement in the op-ed came Thursday from top administration officials, including the office of Vice President Mike Pence, and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

On Wednesday night, Trump tweeted a demand that if "the GUTLESS anonymous person does indeed exist, the Times must, for National Security purposes, turn him/her over to government at once!" White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders called on the "coward" who wrote the piece to "do the right thing and resign."

White House officials did not immediately respond to a request to elaborate on Trumpís call for the writer to be turned over to the government or the unsupported national security ground of his demand.

To some, the ultimatum appeared to play into the very concerns about the presidentís impulses raised by the essayís author. Trump has demanded that aides identify the leaker, according to two people familiar with the matter, though it was not yet clear how they might go about doing so. The two were not authorized to speak publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

READ THE OP-ED: I Am Part of the Resistance Inside the Trump Administration

In a House of Cards-style plot twist in an already over-the-top administration, Trump allies and political insiders scrambled to unmask the writer.

The author, claiming to be part of the "resistance" to Trump "working diligently from within" his administration, said, "Many Trump appointees have vowed to do what we can to preserve our democratic institutions while thwarting Mr. Trumpís more misguided impulses until he is out of office."

"It may be cold comfort in this chaotic era, but Americans should know that there are adults in the room," the author continued. "We fully recognize what is happening. And we are trying to do whatís right even when Donald Trump wonít."

Trump raged about the piece in the White House, calling around to confidants to vent about the disloyalty of the author and fuming that the so-called "Deep State" within the federal government had conspired against him, according to a person familiar with the presidentís views but not authorized to discuss them publicly.

The text of the op-ed was pulled apart for clues: The writer is identified as an "administration official"; does that mean a person who works outside the White House? The references to Russia and the late Sen. John McCain ó do they suggest someone working in national security? Does the writing style sound like someone who worked at a think tank? In a tweet, the Times used the pronoun "he" to refer to the writer; does that rule out all women?

The newspaper later said the tweet referring to "he" had been "drafted by someone who is not aware of the authorís identity, including the gender, so the use of Ďheí was an error."

The Beltway guessing game seeped into the White House, as current and former staffers alike traded calls and texts trying to figure out who could have written the piece, some turning to reporters and asking them for clues. And some of the most senior members of the Trump administration were forced to deny they were the author of the attack on their boss.

Hotly debated on Twitter was the authorís use of the word "lodestar," which pops up frequently in speeches by Pence. Could the anonymous figure be someone in Penceís orbit? Others argued that the word "lodestar" could have been included to throw people off.

In a rare step, Penceís communications director Jarrod Agen tweeted early Thursday that "The Vice President puts his name on his Op-Eds. The @nytimes should be ashamed and so should the person who wrote the false, illogical, and gutless op-ed. Our office is above such amateur acts."

Pompeo, who was in India, denied writing the anonymous opinion piece, saying, "Itís not mine." He accused the media of trying to undermine the Trump administration and said he found that "incredibly disturbing."

Trump, appearing at an unrelated event Wednesday at the White House, lashed out at the Times for publishing the op-ed.

"They donít like Donald Trump and I donít like them," he said of the newspaper. The op-ed pages of the newspaper are managed separately from its news department.

Early Thursday, Trump followed up with a tweet that touted his administrationís accomplishments and, in an oblique reference to the op-ed, fumed that "The Deep State and the Left, and their vehicle, the Fake News Media, are going Crazy - & they donít know what to do." His other morning tweets ó one on North Korea, the other on the economy ó seemed to be an effort to change the subject.

In a blistering statement, the press secretary late Wednesday accused the author of choosing to "deceive" the president by remaining in the administration and putting himself or herself "ahead of the will of the American people. The coward should do the right thing and resign."

Sanders also called on the Times to "issue an apology" for publishing the piece, calling it a "pathetic, reckless, and selfish op-ed."

Showing her trademark ability to attract attention, former administration official Omarosa Manigault Newman tweeted that clues about the writerís identity were in her recently released tell-all book, offering a page number: 330. The reality star writes on that page: "many in this silent army are in his party, his administration, and even in his own family."

The anonymous author wrote in the Times that where Trump has had successes, they have come "despite ó not because of ó the presidentís leadership style, which is impetuous, adversarial, petty and ineffective."

The assertions in the column were largely in line with complaints about Trumpís behavior that have repeatedly been raised by various administration officials, often speaking on condition of anonymity. And they were published a day after the release of details from an explosive new book by longtime journalist Bob Woodward that laid bare concerns among the highest echelon of Trump aides about the presidentís judgment.

The writer of the Times op-ed said Trump aides are aware of the presidentís faults and "many of the senior officials in his own administration are working diligently from within to frustrate parts of his agenda and his worst inclinations. I would know. I am one of them."

The writer also alleged "there were early whispers within the cabinet of invoking the 25th Amendment" because of the "instability" witnessed in the president. The 25th Amendment allows the vice president to take over if the commander in chief is "unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office." It requires that the vice president and a majority of the Cabinet back relieving the president.

The writer added: "This isnít the work of the so-called deep state. Itís the work of the steady state."

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