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After mistaken landing, cargo pilot was confused

WICHITA, Kan. — Moments after touching down, the pilot of a cargo-hauling jumbo jet seemed confused in his exchanges with air-traffic controllers who had guided his Boeing 747 toward a Kansas Air Force base.

When puzzled controllers told the pilot he was 9 miles north of his intended destination, he made an unusual admission. "Uh, yes sir, we just landed at the other airport."

His calm, understated response belied the dangers of the situation: A mammoth jet had just landed on the wrong stretch of concrete, miles from its planned path, in the dark. The runway just happened to be long enough.

As he tried to sort out the situation over the radio, the pilot could be heard mixing up east and west in his notes, acknowledging he could not read his own handwriting and getting distracted from the conversation by "looking at something else."

The 747, flown by a two-person crew with no passengers, intended to touch down late Wednesday at McConnell Air Force Base in Wichita, where it was supposed to deliver parts for Boeing's new 787 Dreamliner to a nearby company that makes large sections of the next-generation jet. Instead, the cargo plane landed at the smaller Col. James Jabara Airport.

The jet took off again Thursday and within minutes landed at its original destination.

The plane flew into an area where there are three airports with similar runway configurations: the Air Force base, the Jabara airfield and a third facility in between called Beech Airport.

That could help explain the mistake.

Although rare, landings by large aircraft at smaller airports have happened from time to time.

In July last year, a cargo plane bound for MacDill Air Force base landed without incident at the small Peter O. Knight Airport on Davis Islands.

A Boeing 747 sits on a runway Thursday, the day after it mistakenly landed at the Col. James Jabara Airport in Wichita, Kan., about 9 miles north of its intended destination.

Associated Press

A Boeing 747 sits on a runway Thursday, the day after it mistakenly landed at the Col. James Jabara Airport in Wichita, Kan., about 9 miles north of its intended destination.

After mistaken landing, cargo pilot was confused 11/21/13 [Last modified: Thursday, November 21, 2013 11:06pm]
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