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After vote on gay youth, Scouts face more turmoil

Boy Scouts of America Chief Scout Executive Wayne Brock addresses questions during a news conference Thursday, accompanied by the organization’s national president Wayne Perry, right. Though Brock pleaded for the Scouting community to reunite after the divisive debate that led to Thursday’s vote to lift the ban on openly gay youth — while keeping the ban on gay adults — he failed to sway some conservative religious leaders whose denominations sponsor many Scout units and who consider same-sex relationships immoral. But gay-rights groups say the vote didn’t go far enough. “They’re not on our good list yet,” said Paul Guequierre of the Human Rights Campaign, a national gay-rights group. He said the HRC, in its annual rankings of corporate policies on workplace fairness, would deduct points from companies that donate to the Boy Scouts until the ban on gay adults is lifted.

Associated Press

Boy Scouts of America Chief Scout Executive Wayne Brock addresses questions during a news conference Thursday, accompanied by the organization’s national president Wayne Perry, right. Though Brock pleaded for the Scouting community to reunite after the divisive debate that led to Thursday’s vote to lift the ban on openly gay youth — while keeping the ban on gay adults — he failed to sway some conservative religious leaders whose denominations sponsor many Scout units and who consider same-sex relationships immoral. But gay-rights groups say the vote didn’t go far enough. “They’re not on our good list yet,” said Paul Guequierre of the Human Rights Campaign, a national gay-rights group. He said the HRC, in its annual rankings of corporate policies on workplace fairness, would deduct points from companies that donate to the Boy Scouts until the ban on gay adults is lifted.

The Boy Scouts of America will get no reprieve from controversy after a contentious vote to accept openly gay boys as Scouts.

Dismayed conservatives are already looking at alternative youth groups as they predict a mass exodus from the BSA. Gay-rights supporters vowed Friday to maintain pressure on the Scouts to end the ban on gay adults serving as leaders.

"They're not on our good list yet," said Paul Guequierre of the Human Rights Campaign, a national gay-rights group. He said the HRC, in its annual rankings of corporate policies on workplace fairness, would deduct points from companies that donate to the Boy Scouts until the ban on gay adults is lifted.

In California, gay-rights leaders said they would continue urging passage of a bill pending in the Legislature that would make the BSA ineligible for nonprofit tax breaks because of the remaining ban.

The Boy Scouts' chief executive, Wayne Brock, pleaded for the Scouting community to reunite after the divisive debate that led to Thursday's vote by the BSA's National Council. The proposal to lift the ban on openly gay youth — while keeping the ban on gay adults — was supported by about 60 percent of the council's 1,400 voting members.

However, Brock's plea failed to sway some conservative religious leaders whose denominations sponsor many Scout units and who consider same-sex relationships immoral.

"Frankly, I can't imagine a Southern Baptist pastor who would continue to allow his church to sponsor a Boy Scout troop under these new rules," Richard Land, a Southern Baptist Conference official, told the SBC's news agency, Baptist Press.

Land advised Southern Baptist churches to withdraw their support of Scout troops and consider affiliating instead with the Royal Ambassadors, an existing SBC youth program for boys that combines religious ministry with Scouting-style activities.

Baptist churches sponsor Scout units serving more than 100,000 of the BSA's 2.6 million youth members.

The Assemblies of God, which oversees units serving more than 2,000 Scouts, said it could no longer support such units and suggested its own Royal Rangers youth group as a "positive alternative."

John Stemberger, a conservative activist and former Scout from Florida who led a group opposing the policy change, said he and his allies would convene a meeting next month in Louisville, Ky., to discuss creation of a "new character development organization for boys."

"We grieve today, not because we are faced with leaving Scouting, but because the Boy Scouts of America has left us," Stemberger said. "Its leadership has turned its back on 103 years of abiding by a mission to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices."

From the left, gay-rights supporters — including President Barack Obama — generally welcomed the move to accept openly gay Scouts but urged the BSA to take the further step of welcoming gay adults as leaders.

White House spokesman Shin Inouye said Obama "continues to believe that leadership positions in the Scouts should be open to all, regardless of sexual orientation."

After vote on gay youth, Scouts face more turmoil 05/24/13 [Last modified: Friday, May 24, 2013 11:37pm]
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