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American, Russian, Italian blast off for space station

Three blast off for space stay

A Soyuz capsule carrying an American, Russian and Italian blasted off today for a six-hour trip to the International Space Station, where the new crew will spend six months conducting a variety of experiments. The Russian spacecraft lifted off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, which Russia leases in Kazakhstan. NASA's Karen Nyberg, Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin and Italy's Luca Parmitano will join three other people — NASA's Chris Cassidy and Russians Pavel Vinogradov and Alexander Misurkin — who have been aboard the space station since March.

Big asteroid to zip past Earth

An asteroid more than 1½ miles long will zoom past Earth on Friday from a far-off distance. The big rock called Asteroid 1998 QE2 will keep a safe distance of 3.6 million miles, or 15 times the distance between Earth and the moon. You won't be able to see it without a powerful telescope. It's believed to be about 1.7 miles long, or about nine times the length of the Queen Elizabeth 2 cruise ship. But that has nothing to do with its name. The letters and number in the name represent the timing and sequence of the asteroid's discovery in 1998. Scientists will use large radar telescopes to study its shape, rotation and surface features.

Quints arrive all healthy

A 34-year-old Utah woman gave birth to a healthy set of quintuplets over the weekend with help from a team of eight doctors, an anesthesiologist and dozens of nurses ensuring the mother and the tiny babies survived. Guillermina and Fernando Garcia's five babies — three girls and two boys — weigh between 2 to 3 pounds each and are expected to stay at the University of Utah hospital in Salt Lake City for six weeks. Doctors predict they will grow up completely healthy. "They are all doing remarkably well," said Dr. Elizabeth O'Brien, of the newborn intensive care unit. Fewer than 10 quintuplet sets are born each year in the United States.

Associated Press

American, Russian, Italian blast off for space station 05/28/13 [Last modified: Wednesday, May 29, 2013 12:35am]
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  1. Tampa Bay Times journalists wins 17 Green Eyeshade Awards

    Human Interest

    Tampa Bay Times journalists placed first in seven categories of the prestigious Green Eyeshade awards, which honors outstanding journalism in the Southeast.

  2. A manatee swims near the entrance to Three Sisters Springs on Kings Bay, some of many springs that feed the Crystal River in Citrus County. The Southwest Florida Water Management District is considering a proposal that would allow a decrease to the amount of fresh water flowing in the Crystal River so that water can be diverted to fuel development. Critics say similar proposals around the state could threaten Florida's environmental health. [DOUGLAS R. CLIFFORD | Times (2014]
  3. Ailing Florida springs could be tapped further to fuel development

    Water

    BROOKSVILLE — Efforts by state officials to set a minimum flow for its iconic springs have stirred up a wave of public opposition. Opponents contend the state is willing to destroy its springs in order to justify continuing to provide water for new development.

    A manatee swims near the entrance to Three Sisters Springs on Kings Bay, one of many springs that feeds the Crystal River in Citrus County. The Southwest Florida Water Management District is considering a proposal to decrease the amount of fresh water flowing in Crystal River so that water can be diverted to fuel development. Critics say similar proposals around the state could threaten Florida's environmental health. [DOUGLAS R. CLIFFORD | Times (2014
  4. Canned by lawmakers, PTC staff say they are now forgotten

    Transportation

    TAMPA — After roughly 20 years in the Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office, Mike Gonzalez got another job with a uniform and badge when he was hired in 2015 as an inspector for the Public Transportation Commission.

    The badge that PTC inspectors carry while on duty. State lawmakers voted to abolish the agency this year leaving its remaining employees fearing for their future.
  5. Ferries from Florida not a priority for Cuban government

    Tourism

    Cruises and commercial flights now link Tampa and Havana, but before the U.S. government approved either for such journeys, ferries had the nod.

    Baja Ferries was among a handful of companies the U.S. government approved to service Cuba two years ago.
But Cuba's ambassador to the United States recently said the wait may be long. Ferries are not a high priority for Cuba.
This is an example of one of the overnight passenger ferries the  Baja Ferries wanted  to use to reach Cuba from Florida.


Photo Credit: Baja Ferries USA LLC