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Boston Marathon fund chief says: Lower expectations

BOSTON — The administrator of a fund created to help Boston Marathon bombing victims has a blunt message for them: Lower your expectations.

Lawyer Kenneth Feinberg said at a public meeting Tuesday that the $28 million One Fund Boston won't pay out nearly enough to fully compensate the families of the three killed or the more than 260 injured, and may not pay much of anything to those with less serious injuries.

"There isn't enough money to pay everybody who justifiably expects it or needs it," he said.

Feinberg's draft plan for distributing the money reserves the highest payments for the families of the three killed in the bombings — Martin Richard, Krystle Campbell and Lu Lingzi — and for the family of MIT police Officer Sean Collier, who was shot to death by the suspects as they attempted to flee. Those who suffered brain damage or double amputation of limbs also have top priority.

Next are those who had single limbs amputated, followed by those who were injured enough to require overnight hospital stays.

No burial resolution

Meanwhile, there was no resolution about where to bury one of the two suspects in the attack. An aide to Boston Mayor Thomas Menino said he did not want to see Tamerlan Tsarnaev, who was a resident of Cambridge, buried in Boston and called the decision "a family issue."

"He believes he should be sent back to Russia. It wouldn't be appropriate for him to be buried in Boston," Menino spokeswoman Dot Joyce said. "He said his family wants him in Russia and that's where he should go."

Worcester funeral home director Peter Stefan says more than 100 people in the United States and Canada have offered burial plots for the body, but officials in those cities and towns have said no. Tsarnaev was killed in a shootout with police days after the April 15 bombings.

Tsarnaev's brother, Dzhokhar, is in a prison hospital.

Boston Marathon fund chief says: Lower expectations 05/07/13 [Last modified: Wednesday, May 8, 2013 3:13am]
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