Boston, NYC mayors disagree with St. Patrick's Day parades' stances on gays

BOSTON — Boston Mayor Martin Walsh is threatening to boycott the St. Patrick's Day parade unless organizers allow a group of gay military veterans to march, joining New York's mayor in protesting parade policies on gay groups.

Walsh, the son of Irish immigrants, said Thursday he has been trying to broker a deal with the city's parade organizers to allow a gay veterans group sponsored by MassEquality to march in this year's parade. He said allowing gay groups to participate is long overdue.

"It's 2014. It's far beyond the time where we should be even having this discussion, because they're veterans who fought for this country just like any other veteran," Walsh said.

"I made a commitment during the campaign ... that I would fight for equality and that's what this is all about."

But parade planners appeared unwilling to budge. Lead parade organizer Philip Wuschke Jr. said gays are not prohibited from marching with other groups. But he said organizers do not want the parade to turn into a demonstration for a particular group.

"The theme of the parade is St. Patrick's Day. It is not a sexually oriented parade," he said. "All we want to do is have a happy parade. The parade is a day of celebration, not demonstration."

In New York, Mayor Bill de Blasio said he will skip the nation's largest St. Patrick's Day parade in Manhattan because participants are not allowed to carry signs or banners identifying themselves as gay.

"I will be participating in a number of other events to honor the Irish heritage of this city," de Blasio said during a press conference earlier this month. "But I simply disagree with the organizers of that parade."

The parade dates from 1762 and draws more than 1 million people every year to watch about 200,000 participants, including marching bands and thousands of uniformed city workers. It has long been a mandatory stop on the city's political trail.

Since the 1990s, the event's ban on pro-gay signs has sparked protests and lawsuits and led to the creation of an alternative, gay-friendly St. Patrick's Day parade in Queens. In recent years, some elected officials — including de Blasio when he was a public advocate — attended the alternative parade and boycotted the traditional parade.

LOUISVILLE, KY.

Judge tosses part of gay marriage ban

A federal judge signed an order Thursday directing officials in Kentucky to immediately recognize same-sex marriages performed in other states and countries. U.S. District Judge John G. Heyburn II issued a final order throwing out part of the state's ban on gay marriages. It makes official his Feb. 12 ruling that Kentucky's ban on same-sex marriages treated "gay and lesbian persons differently in a way that demeans them." Same-sex couples may change their names on official identifications and documents and obtain any other benefits of a married couple in Kentucky. The order doesn't affect a related lawsuit seeking to force the state to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples.

Associated Press

Boston, NYC mayors disagree with St. Patrick's Day parades' stances on gays 02/27/14 [Last modified: Thursday, February 27, 2014 9:34pm]

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