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Cluster of fatal teen car crashes isn't the norm

LUBBOCK, Texas — Derrek Hager had dropped off his girlfriend in the Texas Panhandle and was headed with four other friends to a town to continue enjoying their spring break.

But the teens never made it, perishing in a fiery wreck near Dumas after the driver ran a stop sign and collided with a tanker loaded with fuel.

The deaths of the five teens came the same day as an accident in Ohio that killed six and a day before a crash in Illinois killed four. Three teenagers died Friday in Indiana when police said the drivers of two pickups ran a four-way stop and collided.

The deadly accidents serve as horrific reminders of the perils of teen driving but contrast statistics indicating that fatal crashes among teen drivers have declined during the past decade, according to a report released last month by the Governors Highway Safety Association, which represents state highway safety offices. The report also indicates that deaths of younger teen drivers increased during the first six months of last year, reversing the 10-year trend.

There were 435 16-year-old drivers killed in 2000, according to the report, but by 2011 that had dropped to 173. During the same time period, deaths among 17-year-old drivers dropped from 564 to 250.

But deaths of 16- and 17-year-old drivers in traffic accidents during the first six months of 2012 rose from a year earlier, from 202 to 240. The report, which doesn't include passenger deaths, is based on preliminary data that sometime change.

Despite the recent increase, overall teen driving deaths are significantly lower than they were a decade ago, when teen drivers traveled with fewer state-imposed restrictions, including limits on driving with teen passengers and driving at night.

Meanwhile, fewer American teens are getting driver's licenses, part of a demographic segment that also includes people in their 20s and 30s, transportation researchers have found. Among those groups, the number of people with driver's licenses has dropped significantly during the past three decades in the United States and in some other wealthy nations with a high proportion of Internet users.

Researchers surmise that virtual contact through Internet and other electronic means is reducing the need for face-to-face visits among young people.

Cluster of fatal teen car crashes isn't the norm 03/12/13 [Last modified: Wednesday, March 13, 2013 12:36am]
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