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Court appears conflicted over DNA sampling issue

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court justices sounded closely split Tuesday on what one of them called the most important criminal procedure case in decades — a challenge to whether police may routinely take DNA samples from suspects and put the results in a national database.

"Why isn't this the fingerprinting of the 21st century?" asked Justice Samuel Alito. DNA is even more accurate than fingerprinting and has a great potential to solve horrible crimes, he said.

But his fellow conservative, Justice Antonin Scalia, took up the other side, arguing that the court has not allowed police to freely search people or homes in hopes of finding evidence of other possible crimes.

"If you stick a swab in his mouth, that's a search," Scalia said. "The purpose is to catch bad guys. But sometimes, the Fourth Amendment stands in the way."

Meanwhile, liberal Justice Stephen Breyer said DNA testing seemed entirely reasonable. It's "not intrusive," he said, referring to the mouth swab. And it's more accurate and reliable than fingerprinting, he said.

Others worried about going too far. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg asked if police could stop someone suspicious on the street and ask to take a DNA swab.

"Why not do it for every person who comes in for a driver's license?" asked Justice Elena Kagan, posing another hypothetical.

State attorneys from all 50 states have joined the Obama administration in urging the court to approve DNA testing of people who are arrested but not convicted of serious crimes. All states now authorize testing the DNA of people who are convicted of felony crimes.

Meanwhile, 28 states have gone further and begun taking DNA samples from people who are arrested for a serious crime.

But last year, Maryland's highest court ruled it was an unconstitutional search to take a DNA swab from a man arrested for assault. The suspect, Alonzo King, was later convicted of an unsolved rape based on a DNA match and was sentenced to life in prison. The court will issue a decision in Maryland vs. King in several months.

Other cases before the high court

• The Supreme Court on Tuesday threw out a broad lawsuit that challenged the constitutionality of the government's program of secret wiretapping of international phone calls and emails, ruling that none of the plaintiffs has "standing" to sue because they cannot prove their messages were intercepted. The 5-4 ruling is the latest of many that has shielded the government's antiterrorism programs from being challenged in court.

• The Supreme Court hears arguments today in a challenge to a key provision of the historic 1965 Voting Rights Act. The provision requires all or parts of 16 states with a history of racial discrimination, mostly in the South, to get approval from the Justice Department or federal court in Washington before making any changes in how they hold elections, such as moving a polling place. Shelby County, Ala., is challenging that plank.

Court appears conflicted over DNA sampling issue 02/26/13 [Last modified: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 1:08am]
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