Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Court gave NSA broad authority in foreign surveillance, documents show

WASHINGTON — Virtually no foreign government is off-limits for the National Security Agency, which has been authorized to intercept information from individuals "concerning" all but four countries on Earth, according to top-secret documents.

The United States has long had broad no-spying arrangements with Britain, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. But a classified 2010 legal certification and other documents indicate the NSA has been given far more elastic authority than previously known that allows it to intercept through U.S. companies not just the communication of its overseas targets, but any communication about its targets as well.

The certification — approved by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court and included among a set of documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden — lists 193 countries that would be of valid interest for U.S. intelligence. The certification also permitted the agency to gather intelligence about entities such as the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, European Union and International Atomic Energy Agency, among others.

The NSA is not necessarily targeting all the countries or organizations identified in the certification, affidavits and an accompanying exhibit; it has only been given authority to do so. Still, the privacy implications are far-reaching, civil liberties advocates say, because of the wide spectrum of people who might be engaged in communication about foreign governments and entities and whose communications might be of interest to the United States.

Court gave NSA broad authority in foreign surveillance, documents show 06/30/14 [Last modified: Monday, June 30, 2014 10:58pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, Washington Post.
    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. 'Stranger Things' is coming back; here's the first trailer

    Blogs

    The nostalgia-heavy, small-screen blockbuster Stranger Things returns to Netflix with a new season on Oct. 27 - just in time for a pre-Halloween weekend binge session.

    A scene from the Stranger Things Season 2 trailer.
  2. Photos: Snooty the manatee remained lovable over the years

    Blogs

    Snooty, the world's oldest living manatee in captivity, and arguably the world's most famous, has died, the South Florida Museum announced on Sunday. 

    Carol Audette, manatee aquarium curator, touches noses with Snooty the manatee in 2001.
  3. Surviving the graveyard shift: Convenience store work is fraught with anxiety

    Human Interest

    TAMPA — It's 10 p.m. when the alarm clock goes off and Kara Patnoe gets ready for her overnight shift at a local convenience store.

    Deputies investigate a stabbing at a Riverview 7-Eleven in 2013. [Luis Santana  |   Times]
  4. Snooty, world's oldest captive manatee, dies in accident at Bradenton's South Florida Museum (w/video)

    News

    BRADENTON — Snooty, who was the world's oldest manatee in captivity, was found dead Sunday morning, the South Florida Museum announced.

    Snooty, the Manatee County mascot, turns 60 on Monday. Hundreds of people came to the Parker Manatee Aquarium to see Snooty at his birthday party on Saturday. He was the first manatee to have a recorded birth date on July 21, 1948.

 [Times (2008)]
  5. Deputies: Tampa man killed after car strikes tree

    Accidents

    TOWN 'N COUNTRY — A 24-year-old man was killed early Sunday after he lost control of his car, causing it to hit a pine tree.