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Dangerous cold descends into eastern United States

CHICAGO

Icy, snow-covered roads and high winds made travel treacherous Sunday from the Dakotas and Michigan to Missouri as much of the nation braced for the next winter wallop: a dangerous cold that could break records. • A whirlpool of frigid, dense air known as a "polar vortex" was expected to suppress temperatures in more than half of the continental United States starting today and extending into Tuesday, with wind chill warnings stretching from Montana to Alabama.

It was 5 degrees at kickoff Sunday afternoon inside sold-out Lambeau Field for a playoff game between the Green Bay Packers and the San Francisco 49ers, one of the coldest ever played.

"We suited up, we brought all the snowboarding gear we use … and added to it," said 49ers fan Jeff Giardinelli of Fresno, Calif. "Without the wind, which isn't here yet, we're good. When it gets windy, we'll be ready for it."

The forecast is extreme: 25 below zero in Fargo, N.D., minus 31 in International Falls, Minn., and minus 15 in Indianapolis and Chicago. Wind chills — what it feels like outside when high winds are factored into the temperature — could drop into the minus 50s and 60s. Northeastern Montana was warned of wind chills up to 59 below zero.

"It's just a dangerous cold," said National Weather Service meteorologist Butch Dye in Missouri.

Several Midwestern states received up to a foot of new snow Sunday. The weather service said snowfall at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago totaled more than 11 inches as of 6 p.m. Sunday.

The St. Louis area had about a foot of snow and northern Indiana had at least 8 inches.

Officials closed several Illinois roadways because of drifting snow and warned residents to stay inside. Roads in the Midwest were particularly dangerous, and officials in Missouri said it was too cold for rock salt to be very effective.

Authorities also urged people to check on elderly and disabled relatives and neighbors.

In Chicago, temperatures were expected to bottom out around minus 15 overnight, likely setting a daily record, weather service meteorologist Ed Fenelon said. Earlier Sunday, temperatures sank to minus 20 and colder in northern Minnesota and Grand Forks, N.D.

It hasn't been this cold for almost two decades in many parts of the country. Frostbite and hypothermia can set in quickly at 15 to 30 below zero.

Lorna West, 43, a student and consultant from Columbus, Ohio, said she doesn't believe people unaccustomed to such weather are ready for what's coming.

A Chicago native, she said thermal underwear, lots of layers and "Eskimo coats" with zipped hoods to block the wind were the norm growing up.

"And don't go out if you don't have to," she said.

In Michigan, residents jammed stores to stock up on supplies.

"I made my husband go grocery shopping last night," said Kim Tarnopol, 46, of the Detroit suburb of Huntington Woods. Tarnopol was picking up cold medicine Sunday for her daughter Emma in nearby Berkley, Mich.

Travel problems started early Sunday. In New York City, a plane from Toronto landed at Kennedy International Airport and then slid into snow on a taxiway. No one was hurt, though the airport temporarily suspended operations because of icy runways.

About 1,300 flights had been canceled Sunday at O'Hare and Midway international airports in Chicago, officials said, and there also were cancellations at airports in Boston, Memphis, Nashville and St. Louis.

School was called off today for the state of Minnesota, as well as cities and districts in Wisconsin, Illinois and Indiana and Iowa.

Southern states are bracing for possible record temperatures, too, with single-digit highs expected Tuesday in Georgia and Alabama.

Dangerous cold descends into eastern United States 01/05/14 [Last modified: Monday, January 6, 2014 12:48am]
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