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Documents show GM delayed another recall

DETROIT — General Motors waited years to recall nearly 335,000 Saturn Ions for power steering failures despite getting thousands of consumer complaints and more than 30,000 warranty repair claims, according to government documents released Saturday.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the government's auto safety watchdog, also didn't seek a recall of the compact car from the 2004 through 2007 model years even though it opened an investigation more than two years ago and found 12 crashes and two injuries caused by the problem.

The documents, posted on the agency's website, show yet another delay by GM in recalling unsafe vehicles and point to another example of government safety regulators reacting slowly to a safety problem despite being alerted by consumers and through warranty data submitted by the company.

A recall can be initiated by an automaker or demanded by the government.

Both GM and NHTSA have been criticized by safety advocates and lawmakers for their slow responses to a deadly ignition switch problem in 2.6 million GM small cars. GM acknowledged knowing about the problem for more than a decade, yet didn't start recalling the cars until February. The company says it knows of 13 deaths in crashes linked to the ignition switches, but family members of crash victims say the number is much higher.

The Ion was among GM cars included in a March 31 recall of 1.5 million vehicles worldwide to replace the power steering motors; the recall also covered some older Saturn Auras, Pontiac G6s and Chevrolet Malibus. If cars lose power steering, they can still be steered, but with much greater effort. Drivers can be surprised, lose control and crash.

In a statement issued Saturday, GM acknowledged that it didn't do enough to take care of the power steering problem.

NHTSA closed its investigation because GM recalled the cars.

"This raises more troubling concerns about GM's and NHTSA's actions as well as questions about whether NHTSA has the capability to effectively do its job," said Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo. "I intend to aggressively pursue these issues as our congressional investigation into GM and NHTSA continues."

DeGette was a ranking member of a House subcommittee that grilled GM CEO Mary Barra this month during a hearing on the ignition switch problems.

Saturn Ions are lined up outside a dealership in the Denver suburb of Highlands Ranch in 2006. Ions are part of a recall by GM because of power steering failures.

Associated Press (2006)

Saturn Ions are lined up outside a dealership in the Denver suburb of Highlands Ranch in 2006. Ions are part of a recall by GM because of power steering failures.

Documents show GM delayed another recall 04/19/14 [Last modified: Sunday, April 20, 2014 12:03am]
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