Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

McConnell handily wins GOP primary in Kentucky

WASHINGTON — Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., decisively turned back the first well-financed primary opponent he had faced since being elected in 1984, defeating a tea party-backed conservative who claimed the Senate minority leader had been too willing to compromise with Democrats.

Once thought to be vulnerable to such a challenge from the right, McConnell won with ease over his opponent, the businessman Matt Bevin. McConnell's victory sets up what will be one of the most serious tests of his political career, a general election matchup against the Democratic nominee, Alison Lundergan Grimes, the secretary of state. It is expected to be the costliest Senate race this year.

Kentucky was one of six states holding primaries on Tuesday. Voters in Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Pennsylvania and Oregon also went to the polls.

In Georgia, Michelle Nunn, whose father, Sam Nunn, was a four-term Democratic senator, easily outpaced her Democratic rivals and awaited the outcome of the GOP primary to learn her opponent for the fall.

Setting up a high-profile race in Arkansas, Democratic Sen. Mark Pryor and his Republican challenger, Rep. Tom Cotton, were unopposed for their parties' nominations.

In Kentucky, McConnell easily defeated Bevin, underscoring one of the main lessons emerging from the young primary season: Even in an era of deep dissatisfaction with Washington, political fundamentals like candidate strength, fundraising and incumbency remain paramount.

McConnell spent over $11 million of the nearly $22 million he has stockpiled to cast himself as an effective conservative and to attack Bevin, who had never run for office before.

Bevin criticized McConnell for having been in Washington too long, but McConnell emphasized what his 30 years in the Senate meant for Kentucky.

With Sen. John Cornyn of Texas having won renomination in March, McConnell's victory is the second time this year that an incumbent GOP senator survived a primary threat with ease.

Information from the Associated Press was used in this report.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, left, and his wife, Elaine Chao, talk with poll workers as they prepare to vote Tuesday in Louisville.

Associated Press

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, left, and his wife, Elaine Chao, talk with poll workers as they prepare to vote Tuesday in Louisville.

McConnell handily wins GOP primary in Kentucky 05/20/14 [Last modified: Tuesday, May 20, 2014 11:55pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, Associated Press.
    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Search for missing Army helicopter crew suspended in Hawaii

    Military

    HONOLULU — Officials have suspended the search for five Army soldiers who were aboard a helicopter that crashed during offshore training in Hawaii last week.

    Water safety officials hand over possible debris from an Army UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter crash to military personnel stationed at a command center in a harbor, Wednesday in Haleiwa, Hawaii, a day after. an Army helicopter with five on board crashed several miles off Oahu's North Shore. Officials  suspended the search for five Army soldiers in a helicopter crash during offshore training in Hawaii on Monday. [Associated Press]
  2. Rubio praises Trump for 'excellent' speech on Afghanistan

    Blogs

    Sen. Marco Rubio praised President Donald Trump's "excellent" speech on Afghanistan. Sen. Bill Nelson was less effusive but agreed with the goal.

  3. Gov. Rick Scott blasts report of shifting words on Charlottesville

    Blogs

    Gov. Rick Scott, one of the most scripted politicians in modern Florida history, said Monday that "both sides” bear blame for Charlottesville.

  4. Record $417 million awarded in lawsuit linking baby powder to cancer

    Nation

    LOS ANGELES — A Los Angeles jury on Monday ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay a record $417 million to a hospitalized woman who claimed in a lawsuit that the talc in the company's iconic baby powder causes ovarian cancer when applied regularly for feminine hygiene.

    A bottle of Johnson's baby powder is displayed. On Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, a Los Angeles County Superior Court spokeswoman confirmed that a jury has ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay $417 million in a case to a woman who claimed in a lawsuit that the talc in the company's iconic baby powder causes ovarian cancer when applied regularly for feminine hygiene. [Associated Press]
  5. Search under way for missing sailors; Navy chief orders inquiry

    Military

    SINGAPORE — The U.S. Navy ordered a broad investigation Monday into the performance and readiness of the Pacific-based 7th Fleet after the USS John S. McCain collided with an oil tanker in Southeast Asian waters, leaving 10 U.S. sailors missing and others injured.

    Damage is visible as the USS John S. McCain steers toward Singapore’s naval base on Monday.