Clear81° WeatherClear81° Weather

Notebook: Red Sox, Bruins return with tributes to Boston bombing victims

Notebook

Red Sox, Bruins return with victim tributes

Playing at home for the first time since the bombings, the Boston Red Sox honored the victims and the survivors with a pregame ceremony at Fenway Park. Starting with an emotional video, alternating between celebratory and somber and accompanied by Jeff Buckley's Hallelujah, the tributes continued with a first-pitch ceremony that honored a first responder, a victim of the blast, and a marathon institution. Then David Ortiz took the microphone and, in what he later said was an unplanned outburst, let loose with an expletive that drew a huge cheer from the 35,152 in attendance. "This is our (expletive) city, and nobody is going to dictate our freedom," he said. "Stay strong." Ortiz showed fans the specially designed uniforms saying "Boston" on the front instead of the "Red Sox" they have worn for decades. Both teams wore patches with the "B Strong" logo. The Red Sox said their uniforms would be autographed and auctioned off to raise money for the One Fund Boston, the charity established to help the victims. Neil Diamond, who flew into town on his own and asked if he could sing Sweet Caroline, gave a live performance in the eighth inning. In the bottom half of the inning, Daniel Nava hit a three-run homer to give the Red Sox the lead, and they held on to win 4-3. Across town, the Bruins also returned to the ice. "At least we could all breathe a little easier and sleep a little easier," coach Claude Julien said after the Bruins lost 3-2. "And now it's, hopefully, time to work ourselves into trying to get things back to normal again. But it will always leave a scar somewhere."

Running slower to honor the victims

Many of the 354 runners from Utah who competed in Monday's Boston Marathon formed the Boston 4:09 group to compete Saturday in Salt Lake City Marathon. Their goal was to cross the finish line at the same time the bombs went off in Boston in honor of those who were killed, injured, or not able to finish the race. "It's a feeling of refusing to be bullied," said Paul Fulton, who was one of the pace-setters for the Salt Lake City Marathon. "It's going to be a sense of, 'I'm out here, and I'm not going away.' ''

Symbolic finish

in Tallahassee

Nearly 1,000 people from Florida and Georgia plan to run the final 5.2 miles of the Boston Marathon at a Tallahassee race today in a gesture of support for the runners who were stopped at mile 21 during the bombings. More than a dozen Tallahassee residents ran the Boston Marathon on Monday and many were expected to participate in today's event, event planner Shannon Colavecchio said.'

Czechs say: We

are not Chechens

A number of comments by Americans on social media mistaking the Czech Republic for the country of origin of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects — ethnic Chechen brothers — prompted the Czech ambassador to the United States to act. In a statement posted on the embassy website, Petr Gandalovic said "the Czech Republic and Chechnya are two very different entities — the Czech Republic is a Central European country; Chechnya is a part of the Russian Federation." Gandalovic calls it "a most unfortunate misunderstanding," but some responses on Twitter are less diplomatic. Mirca Sekerova recommends Americans "open a geography book once in a while ... stop blaming our country for this." And Petr Manda commented: "Well done, U.S. education system."

Notebook: Red Sox, Bruins return with tributes to Boston bombing victims 04/20/13 [Last modified: Sunday, April 21, 2013 3:58am]

© 2014 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...