Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

NSA, British spy agency targeted foreign interests, including allies, heads of aid groups

WASHINGTON — British and U.S. spy agencies targeted the office of an Israeli prime minister, the heads of international aid organizations and a European Union official who oversees antitrust issues involving U.S. technology firms, according to secret documents.

The targets were among more than 1,000 listed in documents leaked to journalists by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden.

Though the NSA's past targeting of foreign heads of state has been reported on, the documents show a broad spectrum of interests by the NSA and its British sister agency, the Government Communications Headquarters, or GCHQ, in more than 60 countries, according to reports the New York Times, the Guardian in Britain and Der Spiegel in Germany posted online Friday.

The target lists appear in a set of GCHQ reports and date from 2008 to 2011, according to the New York Times. The lists sometimes identify which agency requested the monitoring, but more often do not.

The reports reflected some obvious targets, such as the Taliban and "various entities in Beijing," as well as some in France and Germany, allied countries in which tensions are already high over revelations of NSA spying.

The documents show that the agencies intercepted emails of several Israeli officials, including one target identified as "Israeli prime minister," the New York Times reported. At the time, January 2009, the prime minister was Ehud Olmert. Two Israeli embassies were also listed.

Israel is considered the United States' closest ally in the Middle East, but it is no secret that both countries routinely spy on each other.

Also spied on was a European Commission official who oversees competition policy and whose office has undertaken an inquiry of Google for alleged prioritization of search-engine results, among other issues. The monitoring took place in 2008 and 2009, the reports said.

Aid organizations also were targeted, the documents said. They included the United Nations Children's Fund and Medecins du Monde, an aid group that provides medical assistance in conflict zones.

The White House is reviewing the efficacy and appropriateness of U.S. surveillance activities, including how the government coordinates with its closest allies.

NSA, British spy agency targeted foreign interests, including allies, heads of aid groups 12/20/13 [Last modified: Friday, December 20, 2013 11:48pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, Washington Post.
    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Jones: Bucs need success to get national respect

    Bucs

    Tampa Bay Times columnist Tom Jones offers up his Two Cents on the world of sports.

    No respect

    Tampa Bay Buccaneers head coach Dirk Koetter walks the field during the second day of mandatory minicamp at One Buccaneer Place in Tampa, Fla., on Wednesday, June 14, 2017. LOREN ELLIOTT   |   Times
  2. Hopes fade after landslide destroys Chinese village (w/video)

    World

    Crews searching through the night in the rubble left by a landslide that buried a mountain village under tons of soil and rocks in southwestern China found 15 bodies, but more than 110 more people remained missing.

    Vehicles and people line a road leading to the site of a landslide in Xinmo village in Mao County on Saturday in southwestern China’s Sichuan Province. More than 100 people remained missing after the village was buried under tons of rocks and soil.
  3. Rookie Jake Faria dissatisfied with performance in Rays' loss to Orioles

    The Heater

    ST. PETERSBURG — The rookie pitcher walked to his locker Saturday after tossing the fourth quality start in as many tries to begin his career. He held the potent Orioles bats to three runs and for six innings gave his team a chance to win.

    Orioles third baseman Manny Machado tags out the Rays’ Mallex Smith at third after a rundown in the first inning.
  4. Thousands converge in two St. Pete locations celebrating LGBT rights

    Human Interest

    ST. PETERSBURG — Tom Rockhill didn't know what to expect Saturday, but by noon people were knocking on the door of his bar Right Around the Corner in Grand Central.

    (From left to right) Emma Chalut 18, gets a rainbow sticker on her cheek from her sister Ellie, 15 both of Jacksonville before the annual St. Pete Pride parade in downtown St. Petersburg on Saturday. This year the route was changed from the Grand Central and Kenwood area to Bayshore Drive.
[EVE EDELHEIT   |   Times]
  5. Retired Florida Supreme Court Justice Parker Lee McDonald dies

    TALLAHASSEE — A former Florida Supreme Court justice, who wrote a decision that prevented lawyers from excluding jurors because of their race, has died.

    Former Florida Supreme Court Justice Parker Lee McDonald died Saturday, the court said in a statement. He was 93.