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Susan Rice wins larger role in foreign policy

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama named outspoken diplomat Susan Rice as his national security adviser Wednesday, giving her a larger voice in U.S. foreign policy despite accusations that she misled the nation in the aftermath of the deadly attack on Americans in Benghazi, Libya.

The appointment, along with the nomination of human rights advocate Samantha Power to replace Rice as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, signals a shift by Obama toward advisers who favor more robust American intervention overseas for humanitarian purposes. But it's unclear whether that philosophy will alter the president's policies in Syria, where he has resisted pressure to use U.S. military force to stem that country's civil war.

Rice's appointment provides a measure of redemption after the contentious Benghazi investigations forced her from consideration as Obama's second-term secretary of state. The president, who vigorously defended Rice from the GOP criticism at the time, lauded his close friend Wednesday as a "patriot who puts her country first."

"Susan is a fierce champion for justice and human decency. But she's also mindful that we have to exercise our power wisely and deliberately," Obama said in the White House Rose Garden.

Rice, 48, takes the influential national security post from Tom Donilon, who is stepping down in July after more than four years in the Obama White House. The president credited Donilon with having "shaped every single national security policy of my presidency," including the renewed U.S. focus on the Asia-Pacific region and the tricky U.S. relationship with Russia.

Rice became entangled in the Benghazi case after asserting in television interviews that the September attack was probably spontaneous, a statement that was later proven false. While Rice said she was relying on talking points crafted by the administration, she became a target for Republicans accusing the White House of trying to cover up a terror attack during the presidential campaign.

Because Rice's new job does not require Senate confirmation, some of the GOP lawmakers who doled out the most aggressive attacks appeared resigned to her promotion through the ranks of Obama's national security team.

Arizona Sen. John McCain, one of Rice's harshest critics, wrote on Twitter Wednesday that he disagreed with her appointment but would "make every effort" to work with her on important matters.

The toughest criticism of Rice Wednesday came from Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee who tangled with former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton over Benghazi at a hearing earlier this year. In a series of tweets, Paul said he questioned "the president's judgment in promoting someone who was complicit in misleading the American public on the Benghazi attacks."

Rice said she looked forward to working with lawmakers from both parties "to protect the United States, advance our global leadership and promote the values Americans hold dear."

Donilon, 58, will stay in his job until July 1. He has been a presence on Obama's national security team since the president's first day in the White House, wielding significant influence while maintaining a low-key style.

. Fast facts

SUSAN RICE: U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, January 2009-present; senior national security adviser on Barack Obama's presidential campaign, 2008; senior foreign policy fellow, Brookings Institution, 2002-2009; senior adviser for national security affairs, John F. Kerry presidential campaign, 2004; assistant secretary of state for African affairs, 1997-2001; special assistant to the president and senior director for African affairs, National Security Council, 1995-1997; director for international organizations and peacekeeping, National Security Council, 1993-1995; management consultant, McKinsey and Co., 1991-93.

SAMANTHA POWER: Former special assistant to the president and senior director for multilateral affairs and human rights, 2009-2013; foreign policy adviser to Barack Obama, 2005-2006, 2008; professor of U.S. foreign policy, human rights and extremism at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government.

Susan Rice wins larger role in foreign policy 06/05/13 [Last modified: Wednesday, June 5, 2013 9:09pm]
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