Sunday, July 22, 2018
News Roundup

The latest on Amtrak crash: Death toll at eight with all passengers accounted for

The latest bulletins from the Associated Press on Tuesday night's Amtrak train wreck in Philadelphia:

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1 p.m.: Amtrak's top official says limited Northeast Corridor service will be restored Monday with full service returning by Tuesday.

President and CEO Joseph Boardman spoke Thursday at the site where a train traveling at more than twice the speed limit flew off the tracks, killing eight people and injuring more than 200.

Boardman also said a technology that could have prevented the crash will be installed throughout the Northeast Corridor by the end of the year.

The technology known as positive train control has been installed on much of the corridor but not on the sharp curve in Philadelphia where the train derailed.

Congress had set the end of the year as the deadline for PTC to be installed on all train tracks.

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12:35 p.m.: Philadelphia Mayor Michel Nutter says all passengers and crew members have been accounted for two days after the deadly Amtrak crash.

Nutter said at a news conference that an eighth body was found in the wreckage Thursday morning. The mayor says that means all 243 people on board have now been accounted for.

Nutter says city officials will not identify any of the victims. Only six of the eight who died have been identified by authorities or friends and family.

The train flew off the tracks Tuesday night as it was traveling at 106 mph, more than twice the speed limit on that section of track.

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12:25 p.m.: A Philadelphia Fire Department official says an eighth body has been found in the wreckage of the Amtrak train that jumped the rails Tuesday night.

Fire Commissioner Derrick Sawyer says a search dog found the body Thursday morning in the mangled first car.

The victim has not been identified; only six of the victims have been identified by authorities or friends and family.

Federal investigators have determined the train was going 106 mph before it derailed Tuesday along a sharp curve where the speed limit drops to 50 mph. But they don't know why it was going so fast.

More than 200 people were injured.

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12:10 p.m.: An official with the National Transportation Safety Board says two cars remain at the site of a deadly derailment in Philadelphia and that the rest have been taken to a secure location for 3D scans.

NTSB board member Robert Sumwalt said Thursday that the two cars are still being worked on at the site. He says that the engine and five cars have been removed.

He says the scan takes precise measurements and can help show what happened to the cars in terms of damage.

Federal investigators have determined the train was going 106 mph before it derailed along a sharp curve where the speed limit drops to 50 mph. But they don't know why it was going so fast.

At least seven people were killed and more than 200 hurt.

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11:30 a.m.: The Facebook page of the engineer of the derailed Amtrak train was changed within hours of the crash to substitute his profile picture with a black rectangle.

Friends of Brandon Bostian seemed to know about his role in it before his name publicly surfaced and rallied to his side.

One Facebook friend whose profile identifies him as an Amtrak engineer in California posted "it could have been any one of us and you are not alone."

Bostian's LinkedIn profile says he was an Amtrak conductor for four years before becoming an engineer in 2010.

His lawyer says he suffered a concussion in the crash and does not recall it but that he has fully cooperated with authorities.

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10:50 a.m.: The lawyer for the engineer of the Amtrak train that flew off the rails in Philadelphia says his client surrendered his cellphone to authorities.

Lawyer Robert Goggin told ABC News that Brandon Bostian immediately consented to a blood test and voluntarily gave up his cellphone after the crash, which killed at least seven people and injured more than 200.

Goggin says Bostian doesn't remember the crash itself but recalls coming to, looking for his bag, retrieving his cellphone and calling 911. He says the engineer's cellphone was off and stored in his bag before the accident, as required.

Federal investigators have determined the train was going 106 mph before it derailed along a sharp curve where the speed limit drops to 50 mph. But they don't know why it was going so fast.

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9:10 a.m.: A hospital official says that 16 victims of the Amtrak derailment in Philadelphia remain at Temple University Hospital, and all are expected to recover.

Dr. Herbert Cushing, Temple's chief medical officer, said Thursday that eight of the patients remain in critical condition and more surgeries are planned.

Seven people were killed in the crash Tuesday and more than 200 were hurt.

Cushing says the patients at the hospital are between 19 and 80 years old and have severe rib injuries. He says some may remain hospitalized for several days.

He says that all of the patients at the hospital have been identified and their families have been notified.

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7:20 a.m.: National Transportation Safety Board member Robert Sumwalt, speaking Thursday on CBS This Morning, took exception to Mayor Michael Nutter's remarks that the engineer at the control of the Amtrak train that crashed in Philadelphia was "reckless and irresponsible."

Sumwalt said Nutter's comments to CNN were "subjective" and "judgmental."

He said investigators are not making any "judgment calls" and hope to interview the engineer "very soon."

Asked about comments by the engineer's attorney that his client cannot remember the crash, Sumwalt said that would not be surprising for somebody who's been through a traumatic event.

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7:10 a.m.: The attorney for the engineer who was at the controls when an Amtrak train crashed in Philadelphia says his client has no recollection of a crash that killed at least seven people.

Appearing on ABC's Good Morning America on Thursday, attorney Robert Goggin says Brandon Bostian remembers attempting to reduce speed as the train entered a curve before he was knocked out and sustained a concussion.

The lawyer says the engineer does not remember deploying the emergency brake. Goggin says Bostian told him the last thing he recalls is coming to, looking for his bag, retrieving his cellphone and calling 911 for help.

Investigators have determined the train was traveling at 106 mph on Tuesday night before it ran off the rails, where the speed limit was 50 mph.

The lawyer says his client's memory could likely return as the head injury subsides.

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6:45 a.m.: Cranes and heavy equipment are working to right the overturned cars from an Amtrak train that crashed in Philadelphia, killing at least seven people.

Investigators have determined the train was traveling at 106 mph Tuesday night before it ran off the rails along a sharp curve where the speed limit drops to just 50 mph.

The National Transportation Safety Board says the engineer applied the emergency brakes moments before the crash but slowed the train to only 102 mph by the time the locomotive's black box stopped recording data.

The engineer refused to give a statement to police.

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