Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

The skinny

The skinny: Store pie crust could void her blue-ribbon win

'Really, really good'

Store pie crust could void her blue-ribbon win

Linda Horton is picky about the ingredients in her prize-winning buttermilk pie. That's what led her to use a store-bought crust before dropping off her entry to be judged at the Kentucky State Fair. Now that quest for the best may cost Horton the blue ribbon that her pie won. Horton, 67, of Louisville said Friday she just hasn't been successful making homemade pie crust. "I tried and tried, but it either comes out too buttery and flaky and falls apart, or else it's hard," she said. She even told the Courier-Journal she used a store-bought crust when the newspaper asked to print the recipe after she took the top prize this year. People who read the recipe published this week asked Kentucky State Fair culinary superintendent Stephen Lee whether it was permissible to use store-bought crust. If it's determined Horton used a store-bought crust, the win will be voided, he said. "About half of the judgment of that pie is on the crust," he said. Horton is not too upset. "I'm not going to worry about it," she said. "They told me it was really, really good."

$1,375

Putting a price on a slice of Di's cake

A 33-year-old slice of cake from Prince Charles and Princess Diana's 1981 wedding has sold at auction for $1,375. The cake, still in its original white and silver presentation box, was sold online Thursday by Nate D. Sanders Auctions of Los Angeles. With the box was a card stating, "With best wishes from Their Royal Highnesses, the Prince & Princess of Wales." Auction house spokesman Sam Heller said the buyer is a private collector. Although the cake came wrapped in its original wax paper, Heller said it wouldn't be a good idea to try to eat it.

Leaving lights off

Sorry, wrong door, says SWAT team

The drug bust was perfectly planned. Unfortunately, Austrian police broke down the wrong door. Police official Josef Knoflach confirmed a media report that a SWAT team that used a battering ram to bust into an apartment at daybreak and surround its sleeping tenant with guns drawn was actually meaning to target the neighboring dwelling. Knoflach said Friday that police in the southern city of Klagenfurt had a hard time reading the apartment numbers because they decided to leave the hall lights off so as not to arouse suspicion. They subsequently went next door and found cocaine, cannabis and what police call a suspicious amount of cash. Two men are in custody.

A world record

That big alligator? It was gigantic

A gigantic alligator caught by a family in Alabama this month has set a Safari Club International world record. AL.com reported that a pair of master measurers from the organization examined the 1,000-pound alligator on Friday, determining a length of 15 feet, 9 inches. That's 13 inches longer than the organization's previous world record American alligator, which had been killed in Texas. The Alabama alligator was caught by the Stokes family in a creek about 80 miles west of Montgomery.

Compiled from wire services

The skinny: Store pie crust could void her blue-ribbon win 08/29/14 [Last modified: Friday, August 29, 2014 8:56pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Rays journal: Homer-happiness returns against Blue Jays

    The Heater

    ST. PETERSBURG — The Rays are back to hitting home runs, which was the norm of the offense for much of the season before the offense went cold.

    Adeiny Hechavarria greets teammate Kevin Kiermaier after his home run during the third inning at the Trop.
  2. Jones: Stop talking and start building a new Rays stadium

    The Heater

    ST. PETERSBURG — It was good to see Major League Baseball commissioner Rob Manfred at Tropicana Field on Wednesday, talking Rays baseball and the hope for a new stadium somewhere in Tampa Bay.

    Commissioner Rob Manfred is popular with the media on a visit to Tropicana Field.
  3. Ousted to political Siberia by Corcoran, Kathleen Peters sets sights on Pinellas Commission

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — The perks of power in Tallahassee are a coveted chairmanship, a Capitol office in a prime location and a prominent seat on the House floor. Now Rep. Kathleen Peters has lost all three, but here's the twist: Her trip to "Siberia" might actually help her reach the next step on the Tampa Bay political …

    Rep. Kathleen Peters, R-South Pasadena, has been relegated to the back row in the State House chamber, moved to a fouth floor office and stripped of her job as chairwoman of a House subcommittee after a series of disagreements with House Speaker Richard Corcoran. [SCOTT KEELER | Tampa Bay Times]
  4. What do kids need to stay away from deadly auto theft epidemic?

    Public Safety

    ST. PETERSBURG — More than a dozen black teenagers told U.S. Congressman Charlie Crist on Wednesday that children need stronger mentors and youth programs to steer clear of the auto theft epidemic plaguing Pinellas County.

    Congressman Charlie Crist (center) listens as Shenyah Ruth (right), a junior at Northeast High School, talks during Wednesday's youth roundtable meeting with community leaders and kids. They met to discuss the ongoing car theft epidemic among Pinellas youth and how law enforcement, elected officials, and community organizations can work together to put an end to this dangerous trend. [DIRK SHADD   |   Times]
  5. Manhattan Casino choice causes political headache for Kriseman

    Growth

    ST. PETERSBURG — Days before the mayoral primary, Mayor Rick Kriseman's decision to let a Floribbean restaurant open in Midtown's historic Manhattan Casino has caused political angst within the voting bloc he can least afford to lose: the black community.

    Last week Mayor Rick Kriseman chose a Floribbean restaurant concept to fill Midtown's historic Manhattan Casino. But that decision, made days before next week's mayoral primary, has turned into a political headache for the mayor. Many residents want to see the building's next tenant better reflect its cultural significance in the black community. [JAMES BORCHUCK   |   Times]