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U.S. memo justifying drone killings is released

NEW YORK — The secret U.S. government memo outlining the justification for the use of drones to kill American terror suspects abroad was released by court order Monday, yielding the most detailed, inside look yet at the legal underpinnings of the Obama administration's program of "targeted killings."

The 41-page memo — whose contents had previously been summarized and released piecemeal — was heavily redacted for national security reasons. But it argues among other things that a targeted killing of a U.S. citizen is permissible under a 2001 law passed by Congress soon after the Sept. 11 attacks. That law empowered the president to use force against organizations that planned and committed the attacks.

"The release of the memo will allow the public to better assess the lawfulness of the government's targeted killing policy and the implications of that policy," said Jameel Jaffer, an American Civil Liberties Union attorney who argued for release of the memo. It was released by the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York.

Jaffer said the memo contains the first formal acknowledgment by the government that the CIA is involved in the program.

The July 2010 memo was written by a Justice Department official who is now a federal appeals court judge, David Barron. It was released after a yearlong legal battle by the New York Times and the ACLU.

The memo specifically provided the legal justification for the September 2011 killing in Yemen of Anwar Al-Awlaki, an al-Qaida leader and onetime cleric at a Virginia mosque who had been born in the United States, and another U.S. citizen, Samir Khan, who edited al-Qaida's Internet magazine. A later strike also killed al-Awlaki's teenage son, who was also a U.S. citizen.

Al-Awlaki had been involved in an abortive attack against the United States and was planning other attacks, the memo said. It said the authority to use lethal force abroad may apply in certain circumstances to a U.S. citizen who is part of the forces of an enemy organization.

The memo said the operation was being carried out against someone who was within the core of individuals against whom Congress had authorized the use of "necessary and appropriate" force.

A drone strike killed Anwar al-Awlaki, an American tied to al-Qaida.

A drone strike killed Anwar al-Awlaki, an American tied to al-Qaida.

U.S. memo justifying drone killings is released 06/23/14 [Last modified: Monday, June 23, 2014 10:35pm]
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