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Boston Marathon bombing survivor Marc Fucarile, center, and his wife Jennifer, left, walk past protester Jose Briceno, right, as they leave federal court, Wednesday, March 4, 2015, in Boston, on the first day of the federal death penalty trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. [Associated Press]

Tsarnaev's attorneys admit he bombed Boston Marathon: 'It was him'

BOSTON — The question, for all practical purposes, is no longer whether Dzhokhar Tsarnaev took part in the Boston Marathon bombing. It's whether he deserves to die for it. In a blunt opening statement at the nation's biggest terrorism trial in nearly 20 years, Tsarnaev's own attorney flatly told a jury that the 21- …

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  1. Father tells jury about boy's death at Boston Marathon

    Criminal

    BOSTON — With Dzhokhar Tsarnaev seated at the defense table no more than 15 feet away Thursday, the father of an 8-year-old boy killed in the Boston Marathon bombing described the moment when he looked down at his son's pale, torn body and realized he wouldn't make it.

    In this courtroom sketch, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, center, is depicted between defense attorneys Miriam Conrad, left, and Judy Clarke, right, during his federal death penalty trial, Thursday, March 5, 2015, in Boston. [Associated Press]
  2. Late winter snowstorm blankets South, Northeast (w/ video)

    Weather

    PHILADELPHIA — A late winter storm blanketed the Northeast on Thursday after zipping across much of the South, leaving hundreds of drivers and their passengers stranded on highways in Kentucky and thousands without power in West Virginia.

    More than 50 miles of Interstate 65 southbound in Kentucky is shut down from the weather, Thursday, March 5, 2015, in Mt. Washington, Ky. Kentucky State Police has reported that the interstate will not reopen for 6-8 hours. Kentucky has been walloped by a winter storm that has dumped nearly two feet of snow in parts of the Bluegrass state. [Associated Press]
  3. Cardinal Egan, retired New York archbishop, dies at age 82

    Obituaries

    NEW YORK — Cardinal Edward Egan, the former archbishop of New York who oversaw a broad and sometimes unpopular financial overhaul of the archdiocese and played a prominent role in the city after the Sept. 11 terror attacks, died Thursday. He was 82.

    Edward Michael Egan, former archbishop of New York, died, Thursday, March 5, 2015 of cardiac arrest in New York. He was 82. [Associated Press]
  4. Americans spent $58 billion to pamper, protect pets in 2014

    Pets

    LOS ANGELES — We feed them, groom them, clothe them and otherwise shell out the big bucks to protect and pamper our pets.

    The American Pet Products Association's annual report on pet industry spending says Americans spent $58 billion in 2014 on their 397 million pets, which range from freshwater fish and reptiles to cats and dogs. [Times files]
  5. Selma's 50th anniversary brings comparisons to Ferguson

    Nation

    They only lasted minutes, but the images of the beatings of civil rights marchers in Selma, Ala., on television permanently seared the inhumanity of Southern segregation onto the American conscience.

    Alabama state troopers use clubs against participants of a civil rights voting march in Selma, Ala., on March 7, 1965. At foreground right, John Lewis, chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, is beaten by a state trooper. The day, which became known as "Bloody Sunday," is widely credited for galvanizing the nation's leaders and ultimately yielded passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. [Associated Press]