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News at noon: 'Affluenza' teen nabbed; flights canceled; Bush and Rubio; Lemmy Kilmister, Bucs podcast and a special homecoming

A woman shovels her driveway in the town of Hudson, west of Montreal, Tuesday, during the first major storm of winter. As severe weather moves toward the East Coast, hundreds of flights are being delayed or canceled. [Graham Hughes | Canadian Press via AP]

A woman shovels her driveway in the town of Hudson, west of Montreal, Tuesday, during the first major storm of winter. As severe weather moves toward the East Coast, hundreds of flights are being delayed or canceled. [Graham Hughes | Canadian Press via AP]

Ethan Couch, the Texas teenager serving probation for killing four people in a drunken-driving wreck after invoking an "affluenza" defense, is in custody in Mexico, weeks after he and his mother disappeared.

Two people have been arrested in Belgium on suspicion of planning attacks in Brussels during the holidays, the federal prosecutor's office says.

To say it's been a very good year for philanthropic giving to certain Florida universities would be an understatement. Robert Triguax looks at the millions donated to state schools this year.

Dozens of flights into and out of Tampa International are being affected as the severe storms in the Midwest move toward the East Coast.

A new ad from the Jeb Bush super PAC hits Marco Rubio for missing votes and key national security meetings in Washington. "Politics first, that's the Rubio way," a narrator says. The ad will run in Iowa for the next two weeks at a cost of $1.4 million, according to Right to Rise.

Jay Cridlin writes of Lemmy Kilmister: Even his name sounded like something you needed a permit to carry. Cridlin looks back at the singer and bassist of British hard rockers Motorhead, who died Monday. Also, our look back at the best concerts of 2015 continues at the Soundcheck blog.

However, if you're finished with looking back, here's a great way to start planning for 2016. Our critics and writers, always here to guide your choices, have the inside track on the most noteworthy, exciting and otherwise interesting things coming your way in six different fields of entertainment next year — movies, music, art, stage, attractions and restaurants. If you want to get good — and we mean really good — in any one area, click here and start marking up your calendar out now. And if you just want to sample a little of everything this year, the list should help you pick and choose.

EVE EDELHEIT | Times

William Wade waits to walk onto the field Nov. 14 during homecoming at Florida State — something he couldn't do 35 years ago.

Thirty-five years ago, William Wade performed an act of subversion ahead of its time: Wade, then a 17-year-old junior at Florida State, ran for homecoming princess — and won. His unexpected victory pit New Florida against Old Florida. The university's tradition-bound establishment was furious. His classmates heckled him, threw rocks as he walked across campus. The police told him it was too dangerous for him to appear on the field at halftime. Someone had threatened to shoot him. Now, he has returned to Doak Campbell Stadium as a 52-year-old man, not for a do-over of the 1980 homecoming but to close this chapter of his life. He must take these 60 steps across the famed football field to finally grow up. Read more about William Wade's real homecoming.

CANNON FODDER PODCAST

Catch up with this week's edition of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers podcast, Cannon Fodder, with Rick Stroud and Greg Auman.

News at noon is a weekday feature from tampabay.com. Check in Monday through Friday for updates and information on the biggest stories of the day.

News at noon: 'Affluenza' teen nabbed; flights canceled; Bush and Rubio; Lemmy Kilmister, Bucs podcast and a special homecoming 12/29/15 [Last modified: Tuesday, December 29, 2015 1:15pm]
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  1. Secret Service says it will run out of money to protect Trump and his family Sept. 30

    National

    WASHINGTON — The Secret Service said Monday that it has enough money to cover the cost of protecting President Donald Trump and his family through the end of September, but after that the agency will hit a federally mandated cap on salaries and overtime unless Congress intervenes.

    Secret service agents walk with President Donald Trump after a ceremony to welcome the 2016 NCAA Football National Champions the Clemson Tigers on the South Lawn of the White House on June 12, 2017. [Olivier Douliery | Sipa USA via TNS]
  2. After fraught debate, Trump to disclose new Afghanistan plan

    War

    WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump will unveil his updated Afghanistan policy Monday night in a rare, prime-time address to a nation that broadly shares his pessimism about American involvement in the 16-year conflict. Although he may send a few thousand more troops, there are no signs of a major shift in …

    U.S. soldiers patrol the perimeter of a weapons cache near the U.S. military base in Bagram, Afghanistan in 2003. Sixteen years of U.S. warfare in Afghanistan have left the insurgents as strong as ever and the nation's future precarious. Facing a quagmire, President Donald Trump on Monday will outline his strategy for a country that has historically snared great powers and defied easy solutions.  [Associated Press (2003)]
  3. Trial begins for man accused of threatening to kill Tampa federal judge

    Criminal

    TAMPA — Jason Jerome Springer was in jail awaiting trial on a firearms charge when he heard inmates talking about a case that had made the news.

    His attorney said Jason Jerome Springer, 39, just talked, and there was “no true threat.”


  4. Editorial: Tampa Electric customers should not pay for utility's fatal misjudgments

    Editorials

    There will be financial fallout from the terrible miscalculations that resulted in five workers being killed in June at Tampa Electric's Big Bend Power Station. State and federal regulators should ensure those costs are borne by the company's shareholders, not its customers. Monetary considerations will not begin to …

    LUIS SANTANA   |   Times
There will be financial fallout from the terrible miscalculations that resulted in five workers being killed in June at Tampa Electric's Big Bend Power Station. State and federal regulators should ensure those costs are borne by the company's shareholders, not its customers.
  5. Superior Uniform acquires Los Angeles-based PublicIdentity

    Corporate

    SEMINOLE — A subsidiary of Seminole-based Superior Uniform Group has acquired Los Angeles-based branded merchandise company PublicIdentity Inc.

    Superior Uniform Group CEO Michael Benstock
[Courtesy of Superior Uniform Group]