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News groups file lawsuit over execution drugs

missouri

News media file lawsuit over execution drugs

A group of news organizations sued the Missouri Department of Corrections on Thursday, arguing that the department is violating the First Amendment by refusing to identify the sources of lethal drugs used in its executions. Government secrecy surrounding the cocktail of drugs used in lethal injections has become a deeply contested fight between states, on the one hand, and defense lawyers and news organizations on the other. In Louisiana, state legislators are trying to pass a bill that would keep information about companies that supply drugs for executions confidential. A similar bill passed last year in Georgia. The lawsuit was filed in the district court in Cole County, which includes Jefferson City, the state capital, and was brought by the Associated Press, the Guardian and three newspapers in Missouri. It says prisoners are executed using "a secret drug formulation obtained from secret sources." The practice denies the public its rightful access to important information about the criminal justice system, the news groups said.

indiana

Governor plans to expand Medicaid

It looks as if Indiana may soon join the list of red states signing up for the Affordable Care Act's Medicaid expansion. Republican Gov. Mike Pence, after months of discussions with the Obama administration, offered a plan Thursday to expand Medicaid coverage to low-income uninsured Hoosiers. About two dozen states, including Florida, still haven't joined the Affordable Care Act Medicaid expansion, which extends coverage to low-income adults earning up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level. Among the states that haven't expanded, there are about 5 million poor adults who don't earn enough to qualify for federal subsidies on the Obamacare health insurance marketplaces.

sao paulo, brazil

World Cup protest turns violent

Protesters and police clashed in Sao Paulo on Thursday, as demonstrations against the World Cup and rallies calling for improved public services erupted in several Brazilian cities. Officers in Brazil's largest city fired tear gas and rubber bullets at protesters who set piles of trash alight to barricade a central avenue. Demonstrators blasted the billions spent to host next month's soccer tournament and said they wanted to draw attention to what they called a lack of investment to improve poor public services. "We are beginning to gain strength to go against the injustices of the World Cup," said Luana Gurther, a social sciences student. "We are the ones who should decide where the public money goes. More funding for schools, hospitals, housing, transportation— not the Cup." Protesters staged a soccer game with dirty tactics, and one man put on a costume of a giant skeleton dressed as a Brazil player. The demonstration turned violent when some people smashed the windows of a Hyundai car dealership and the offices of a bank. Police arrested seven people carrying Molotov cocktails

Elsewhere

Sudan: A pregnant Sudanese woman who refused to renounce her Christianity was sentenced to death by hanging Thursday in a Khartoum court, provoking outrage from human rights groups. Meriam Yehya Ibrahim, who has a young son and is married to a Christian from South Sudan, violated Islamic sharia law, the court said. She insists she was raised Christian, not Muslim.

News groups file lawsuit over execution drugs 05/15/14 [Last modified: Thursday, May 15, 2014 10:06pm]
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