Wednesday, October 17, 2018
Obituaries of Note

John Anderson, who ran against Reagan and Carter in 1980, dies at age 95

John Anderson, a former Republican congressman from Illinois who bolted his party to run as a plain-spoken independent candidate for president in 1980, drawing an enthusiastic if transient following among liberals and college students, died Sunday night in Washington. He was 95.

His family announced his death in a statement, the Associated Press reported.

In his first three years in the House of Representatives, starting in 1961, Mr. Anderson, a former prosecutor and a decorated World War II veteran, received a zero rating from the liberal group Americans for Democratic Action. Not long after entering the Capitol, he proposed a constitutional amendment declaring that "this nation devoutly recognizes the authority and law of Jesus Christ, Savior and Ruler of nations."

The measure never came to a vote, and he later apologized for it.

Though his views began to moderate, he was still conservative enough in 1969 for the Republicans to elect him chairman of the House Republican Conference, the third-ranking leadership position. He held the post through 1979, though not without fighting off challenges from the right. By then, the ADA had put his voting record in the mid 40s, and he had harshly criticized President Richard Nixon, a fellow Republican, over his handling of the Watergate scandal.

The United States was struggling with a recession, a severe energy crisis and the protracted Iranian hostage crisis in 1980 when Mr. Anderson gave up a safe seat in the House of Representatives to seek the Republican presidential nomination. When that try fizzled, he reintroduced himself as an independent.

For a while he had the national spotlight, a 58-year-old maverick whose prematurely white hair, horn-rimmed glasses and clearheaded presentation gave him the air of a genial professor who was not so much above the fray as he was unwilling to play by its rules.

Mr. Anderson refused to pander, telling voters in Iowa that he favored President Jimmy Carter’s embargo on grain sales to the Soviet Union after it had invaded Afghanistan. He called for a gasoline tax of 50 cents per gallon — when a gallon cost $1.15 — to save energy.

His backers promoted his campaign style as "the Anderson difference," but despite it — or perhaps because of it — he never finished better than second in a Republican primary. That came in Illinois, his home state, which he had expected to win. When he did not, losing to Ronald Reagan by less than 12 points (Reagan was born in Illinois), he decided to run as an independent.

Drawing support from moderate to liberal Republicans and liberal Democrats and finding a receptive audience on college campuses, Mr. Anderson did well in the polls at the start. But his support drifted as voters turned to candidates who they believed could actually win the White House. On Election Day, when Reagan won in a landslide, Mr. Anderson ended up with 6.6 percent of the popular vote.

Comments
Bunny Ranch owner and GOP candidate Dennis Hof dies in Nevada

Bunny Ranch owner and GOP candidate Dennis Hof dies in Nevada

Dennis Hof, the limelight-loving Bunny Ranch owner who parlayed his legal pimp fame into a GOP nomination for the Nevada Assembly, has died.The brothel boss who billed himself as the “Trump from Pahrump” turned 72 on Sunday.Porn star Ro...
Updated: 7 hours ago
Microsoft co-founder, philanthropist Paul Allen dies at 65

Microsoft co-founder, philanthropist Paul Allen dies at 65

SEATTLE — Paul G. Allen, who co-founded Microsoft with his childhood friend Bill Gates before becoming a billionaire philanthropist who invested in conservation, space travel and professional sports, died Monday. He was 65.He died in Seattle f...
Published: 10/15/18
‘Cabbie Dave,’ who found happiness in and out of The Hub tavern, dies at 65

‘Cabbie Dave,’ who found happiness in and out of The Hub tavern, dies at 65

TAMPA — The Hub is known for stiff drinks, PBR by the can, a haze of cigarette smoke and an eclectic cast of regulars wearing collars both blue and white.But the corner watering hole in the shadow of the Tampa Theatre downtown has lost one of its reg...
Published: 10/10/18
Epilogue: Stephen Goldman, first director of the Florida Holocaust Museum, remembered as a passionate and creative educator

Epilogue: Stephen Goldman, first director of the Florida Holocaust Museum, remembered as a passionate and creative educator

ST. PETERSBURG — Friends and colleagues remember Stephen Goldman as dedicated to the Florida Holocaust Museum and its lessons of tolerance.He was the museum’s first director and helped it grow and move from cramped quarters in Madeira B...
Published: 10/10/18
Roy R.

Roy R. "Robin" Lewis III, environmentalist with close ties to Tampa Bay, dead at 74

Roy R. "Robin" Lewis III, a certified environmental professional and senior ecologist whose work was well known internationally, died Sept. 24 at his home in Marion County’s Salt Springs. He was 74.Mr. Lewis was a member of the National Association o...
Published: 10/08/18
‘Big Mike’ sold water, made friends, and lived his life beside an I-275 on-ramp

‘Big Mike’ sold water, made friends, and lived his life beside an I-275 on-ramp

TAMPA — He was homeless, yet he had a corner to call home.For 20 years, Michael Gentry stood or sat near the traffic light on Scott Street where the entrance ramps split to admit long lines of traffic onto Interstates 275 and 4.At night, he slept on ...
Published: 10/01/18
Updated: 10/02/18
Epilogue: Erin Kitzinger, filmmaker and yogi, remembered for caring spirit

Epilogue: Erin Kitzinger, filmmaker and yogi, remembered for caring spirit

ST.PETERSBURG — Erin Kitzinger, a filmmaker and yoga instructor, always marched to the beat of her own drum.“Even from an early age she never followed the crowd,” her mother, Linda Zweifel, said. “She always wanted to do t...
Updated one month ago
At memorial service, attorney Barry Cohen remembered as someone who cherished his friends and the law

At memorial service, attorney Barry Cohen remembered as someone who cherished his friends and the law

Barry Cohen made a lot of friends throughout his long career as one of Tampa’s top criminal defense attorneys.But Cohen also made enemies, his fellow attorney Steve Yerrid told the Tampa Bay Times.Cohen would have welcomed them all to his memorial se...
Updated one month ago
Legendary Tampa criminal defense attorney Barry Cohen dies at 79

Legendary Tampa criminal defense attorney Barry Cohen dies at 79

TAMPA — The accused and the wronged beat a path to Barry Cohen’s door. The tenacious, canny criminal defense attorney took on pharmaceutical giants and law enforcement agencies. When judges and attorneys needed representation, they often...
Updated one month ago
Epilogue: Robert Judson Jr., a pioneer in Pasco-Hernando education

Epilogue: Robert Judson Jr., a pioneer in Pasco-Hernando education

Robert Judson Jr. was known simply as "The Voice." "He had a magnetic voice, made for radio, made for television," said Tim Beard, president of Pasco-Hernando State College, a position Mr. Judson held from 1994 to 2005. "To hear him talk was like, ...
Updated one month ago