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Huber Matos, a top commander who broke with Fidel Castro, dies at 95

Huber Matos, 95, a top commander in Fidel Castro's army who broke from the Cuban revolution in 1959 over its tilt toward communism, endured a harsh imprisonment for 20 years and became a leader of anti-Castro exiles in Florida, died of a heart attack Feb. 27 in Miami.

Joel Brinkley, 61, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter who spent more than two decades at the New York Times, where he was a correspondent and an editor, died of acute undiagnosed leukemia Tuesday in Washington. He was a son of TV news anchor David Brinkley.

Gerard Mortier, 70, a visionary opera company leader whose bold theatricality and updating of the canon helped define the art form's modern history, died of pancreatic cancer March 8 in Brussels.

Maj. Kurt Chew-Een Lee, 93, a Chinese-American who led Marines into battle against the Chinese in the Korean War and was cited for bravery for helping to preserve a crucial evacuation route for 8,000 U.S. soldiers, was found dead March 3 in Washington. He is believed to have been the first Asian-American officer in the Marine Corps.

Leo Bretholz, 93, who made a daring escape from the Nazis by jumping off a moving train en route to Auschwitz and decades later led a campaign for reparations from the French railway that carried thousands of others to their deaths during the Holocaust, died March 8 in Pikesville, Md.

Justin Kaplan, 88, a Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer renowned for his lives of Mark Twain, Walt Whitman and Lincoln Steffens, and who was later known as the editor of Bartlett's Familiar Quotations — a job akin to running the admissions committee of the most selective college in the world — died of Parkinson's disease March 2 in Cambridge, Mass.

Alain Resnais, 91, the French filmmaker who helped introduce literary modernism to the movies and became an art-house star with nonlinear narrative films like Hiroshima Mon Amour and Last Year at Marienbad, died March 1 in Paris. He blended scrambled memories, deja vu and fantasy into his work.

Jim Lange, 81, the original host of The Dating Game, the hit TV show that distilled the Swinging Sixties into a potent blend of on-screen matchmaking, jovial innuendo and unstinting Mod aesthetics, died of a heart attack Feb. 25 in Mill Valley, Calif.

Huber Matos, a top commander who broke with Fidel Castro, dies at 95 03/15/14 [Last modified: Saturday, March 15, 2014 6:41pm]

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