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Pentagon holds gay pride event

WASHINGTON — In the course of a year, Marine Capt. M. Matthew Phelps says he went from being a gay man "in the closet," afraid of being discharged, to invitee at the White House gay pride reception, drinking champagne with his commander in chief.

Phelps told his story Tuesday at the Pentagon's first-ever event to recognize the service of gay and lesbian troops. The historic event came nine months after repeal of the 18-year-old "don't ask, don't tell" policy that had prohibited gay troops from serving openly and forced more than 13,500 service members out of the armed forces.

"Last June . . . I was at a point in my career that if anyone had found out that I was gay . . . I could have lost my job," Phelps told some 400 uniformed and civilian Defense Department employees packed into a Pentagon auditorium.

"A year later . . . I, Capt. Matthew Phelps, was invited to attend this pride reception at the White House," Phelps said of the June 15 reception hosted by President Barack Obama. "And I thought how amazing is it over the course of a year, I could go from being fired for being who I am, to having champagne with the commander in chief — on cocktail napkins with the presidential seal on it."

Phelps appeared on a panel of current and former service members, some of whom told of their experiences before the repeal of "don't ask, don't tell" and how life is different now.

"For those service members who are gay and lesbian, we lifted a real and personal burden from their shoulders," top Pentagon lawyer Jeh Johnson said in a speech opening the event. "They no longer have to live a lie in the military" or "teach a child to lie to protect her father's career."

Pentagon holds gay pride event 06/26/12 [Last modified: Tuesday, June 26, 2012 10:39pm]
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