Anthrax leaks were poisoned

Bruce Ivins had access to biological weapons even though a counselor judged him “homicidal, sociopathic.”

AP photo/Frederick News Post, Sam Yu

Bruce Ivins had access to biological weapons even though a counselor judged him “homicidal, sociopathic.”

Bruce Edwards Ivins, a top anthrax researcher at the U.S. government's biological weapons research laboratories, may have acted alone in carrying out the anthrax attacks that killed five people in the United States in September 2001. (I don't want to presume his guilt or anything else about this case until we see further details about the government's evidence against him.) But he most certainly did not act alone in falsifying information so the attacks could be used as a pretext for war.

In an important piece for Salon.com, Glenn Greenwald demonstrates, with copious evidence, that a major government scandal lurks behind the anthrax story. He writes: "If the now-deceased Ivins really was the culprit behind the attacks, then that means that the anthrax came from a U.S. government lab, sent by a top U.S. Army scientist at Fort Detrick. Without resort to any speculation or inferences at all, it is hard to overstate the significance of that fact. From the beginning, there was a clear intent on the part of the anthrax attacker to create a link between the anthrax attacks and both Islamic radicals and the 9/11 attacks."

(Ivins died of an apparent suicide just as the Justice Department was about to charge him with responsibility for the attacks.)

Greenwald continues: "Much more important than the general attempt to link the anthrax to Islamic terrorists, there was a specific intent — indispensably aided by ABC News — to link the anthrax attacks to Iraq and Saddam Hussein."

ABC claimed it had been told by "four well-placed and separate sources" that the anthrax used in the September attack contained bentonite, which therefore suggested it was produced in Iraq. As Greenwald points out, "That means that ABC News' 'four well-placed and separate sources' fed them information that was completely false."

Greenwald goes on to provide details about the psychological impact that the anthrax fabrications played in influencing journalists and propagandizing the American public to support the invasion of Iraq. He also notes that John McCain and Joe Lieberman were among the first people to claim publicly that the anthrax came from Iraq. (Interestingly, the Bush White House repeatedly denied this claim, despite its overall tendency to exaggerate and fabricate evidence linking Iraq to weapons of mass destruction.)

Of course, ABC News knows the identity of the "well-placed sources" who fed this false information to them and, through them, to the American public. I'll leave it to Greenwald to explain the implications:

And yet, unbelievably, they are keeping the story to themselves, refusing to disclose who did all of this. They're allegedly a news organization, in possession of one of the most significant news stories of the last decade, and they are concealing it from the public, even years later.

They're not protecting "sources." The people who fed them the bentonite story aren't "sources." They're fabricators and liars who purposely used ABC News to disseminate to the American public an extremely consequential and damaging falsehood.

Just as the FBI has a responsibility to share publicly its evidence linking Ivins to this crime, ABC has some explaining to do about the disinformation that it helped disseminate to the American people.

(MediaBistro.com reached ABC's Brian Ross, the lead reporter on the anthrax stories in late 2001, who said he was not lied to, but that the sources' information was overrun by developments, therefore flawed and outdated: "Our sources were current and former government scientists who were all involved in analyzing the substance in the letter."

He also makes clear that Ivins was not one of those scientists. "No he was not. If it was Ivins, I would report that in a second," Ross said.)

The anthrax attack of September 2001 was an act of terrorism that killed five innocent people. At the time, and for years thereafter, many people were led to believe that the perpetrators were Islamic extremists in service to a hostile foreign power. The FBI is now claiming that the perpetrator was a Roman Catholic and an employee of the U.S. Army who held a position of trust that gave him access to biological weapons — even though he was, according to his counselor, "homicidal, sociopathic." This is a major scandal by any measure. The public deserves to know how American institutions — including the U.S. Department of Defense as well as the news media — could have failed them this badly.

Sheldon Rampton writes for the nonprofit Center for Media and Democracy, which "strengthens participatory democracy by investigating and exposing public relations spin and propaganda, and by promoting media literacy and citizen journalism, media 'of, by and for the people.' "

Anthrax leaks were poisoned 08/09/08 [Last modified: Saturday, August 9, 2008 4:36am]

    

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