Saturday, April 21, 2018
Perspective

Conservative media blows a dog whistle

As someone who has just written a book on how modern media use race-baiting to attract and keep audiences, watching Tuesday's election results felt like seeing the world prove ideas I have been chewing on for more than a year.

The central concept of my book Race-Baiter — that most people will reject overtly prejudiced ideas and stereotypical "code words" if you just discuss them openly — seemed to play itself out in the election returns, as voters not only chose to re-elect a black president, but sent a record number of women to Congress and embraced laws allowing gay marriage.

And this was not long after conservatives used anti-gay marriage legislation to try drawing voters to the polls.

As always, Fox News pundit Bill O'Reilly neatly articulated the fears and attitude of his audience Tuesday, even before news anchors were comfortable calling the election for President Barack Obama.

"It's a changing country," O'Reilly noted Tuesday. "The demographics are changing. It's not a traditional America anymore. And there are 50 percent of the voting public who want stuff. They want things. And who is going to give them things? President Obama. He knows it. And he ran on it."

And Fox News' biggest star wasn't done accusing people who aren't traditional Americans for derailing the country.

"Whereby 20 years ago, President Obama would have been roundly defeated by an establishment candidate like Mitt Romney, the white establishment is now the minority," O'Reilly added. "(It's) a tremendous Hispanic vote for President Obama. Overwhelming black vote for President Obama. And women will probably break President Obama's way. People feel that they are entitled to things, and which candidate between the two is going to give them things?"

This, of course, is a longstanding stereotype leveled against Democrats in general and this black president in particular.

As I note in my book, this concept powered Newt Gingrich's dismissive "food stamp president" line in referring to the president, evoking fears that a black president secretly wants to hand free government assistance to people of color who "want stuff" from the government without working.

It also robs Obama of any credit for his own success. The president isn't depicted as a politician talented enough to win re-election despite a sluggish economy and nagging unemployment numbers.

In O'Reilly's world, Obama was elected because women and people of color want to be given things, marginalizing the "white establishment" in the process.

Surprisingly, radio host Rush Limbaugh was more subtle in delivering a similar message Wednesday, using the word "traditional" to describe what was rejected by voters Tuesday.

"Romney presented a picture. ... This is very frightening stuff to me. He presented a picture of the traditional view, the traditional roots, the traditional way things work in this country," Limbaugh said. "And part of his campaign ... there was an assumption, I think, that that's what most people were looking for and wanted a return to."

He added: "For many of us, the country's at a point where it's never been in our lifetimes economically. We figured we had one chance to stop this direction and reverse it, take it back to the traditional path of American greatness. It was rejected. That America is not desired. That America is not wanted."

But what does Limbaugh mean by the "traditional path of American greatness?" Later, he said "Mitt Romney and his family would have been the essence of exactly what this country needs. ... Romney's recipe was the old standby: American route to success, hard work. That gets sneered at. I'm sorry. In a country of children where the option is Santa Claus or work, what wins?"

But I've never understood why conservatives like Limbaugh would hold up Romney, born in wealth as the son of an auto executive and former governor, yet ignore the child of a single mother, eventually raised by his grandparents who worked from humble beginnings to become president of the Harvard Law Review, a state senator, U.S. senator and then two-term president.

Why isn't that a story of taking the American route to success through hard work? Why is it assumed that, somehow, Obama didn't earn the achievements he's made?

Welcome to the world of code words. But this time around, they didn't quite work so well.

Not enough women were distracted from the harsh words about rape and abortion advanced by some GOP candidates. Not enough Hispanics were distracted from the hard-line stance on immigration advocated by many conservatives.

And lots of people talked about what the code words meant when they heard them.

One email to me from a reader Wednesday criticized the massive black vote for Obama Tuesday, estimated at more than 90 percent, saying if white people had done the same, there would be accusations of racism. But according to a Factcheck.org analysis from 2008, Democrat John Kerry got 88 percent of the black vote in 2004, Democrat Al Gore got 90 percent of the black vote in 2000 and Democrat Lyndon Johnson got 94 percent of the black vote in 1964, after signing the Civil Rights Act ending segregation.

The Factcheck.org piece said black people mostly voted Republican after the Civil War, when GOP legend Abraham Lincoln ended slavery. It wasn't until Franklin Delano Roosevelt's time, when Democrats' opposition to allowing black people to participate in the political process eased, that African-Americans began to vote Democratic in presidential elections.

This piece indicates the black vote isn't about skin color. It's about choosing a leader sensitive to the issues facing black people: equal civil rights, equal participation in society and freedom from institutional racism.

Another email from a reader who seemed to be a white person concluded, "My values and my opinion about what is best for our country going forward is now in the minority."

But given that Obama only got just over 50 percent of the popular vote, I'm not sure that's entirely true.

What is true: O'Reilly and Limbaugh's "traditional" voters now have to really share power with other groups who have a different vision for how government should help all Americans.

Welcome to the world of real equality, where the dog whistles and code words don't work anymore.

Comments
Perspective: The Heartland to Headwaters Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition finds frustration and fear seeking a safe a path for wildlife across Interstate 4

Perspective: The Heartland to Headwaters Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition finds frustration and fear seeking a safe a path for wildlife across Interstate 4

The original Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition in 2012 was inspired by the how the Florida black bear roamed ó and the space it needed to do so successfully. In 2010, expedition team member Joe Guthrie conducted research through the University of ...
Published: 04/22/18
Book review: James Comey wants to explain himself

Book review: James Comey wants to explain himself

In 2016, as the director of the FBI, James Comey publicly dissected Hillary Clintonís email server controversy. Later, we learned that Comey was keeping to himself the beginnings of an investigation into Russiaís active interference in the U.S. elect...
Published: 04/19/18
Updated: 04/20/18
Column: Why the Starbucks racial bias training is more than just good PR

Column: Why the Starbucks racial bias training is more than just good PR

Starbucks isnít really in the coffee business. Weíve known that for over a decade. McDonaldís coffee is better and cheaper than Starbucks, but that hasnít done any harm to the coffee shopís bottom line. Thatís because what people are paying for when ...
Published: 04/19/18
Updated: 04/20/18

"ISNíT EVEN A 1,"is how Michael Cohen, President Donald Trumpís personal lawyer and close friend, would rate on a scale of 1 to 100, where 100 is fully protecting the president. Thatís how one of Trumpís longtime legal advisers, Jay Goldberg, says he...
Published: 04/16/18
Updated: 04/20/18
Perspective: The Heartland to Headwaters Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition will hope to find a path across Interstate 4 for wildlife

Perspective: The Heartland to Headwaters Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition will hope to find a path across Interstate 4 for wildlife

n two expeditions, three friends and trailblazing conservationists have already trekked more than 2,000 miles through wildlands crisscrossing the state to prove the viability of a Florida Wildlife Corridor, a network of the best remaining connected w...
Published: 04/13/18
Updated: 04/14/18
A Little Perspective: Interesting news and notes from around the world

A Little Perspective: Interesting news and notes from around the world

THE QUIZ: Four cards are laid in front of you, each of which has a letter on one side and a number on the other. The sides that you see read E, 2, 5 and F. Your task is to turn over only those cards that could decisively prove the truth or falsity of...
Published: 04/12/18
Updated: 04/20/18
PolitiFact: A closer look at attorney-client privilege after raid of Donald Trumpís lawyer

PolitiFact: A closer look at attorney-client privilege after raid of Donald Trumpís lawyer

President Donald Trump lashed out after the FBI seized business records, emails and tax documents belonging to his personal attorney Michael Cohen.Law enforcement executed warrants on Cohenís Manhattan office, home and hotel room as part of an invest...
Published: 04/11/18
Updated: 04/13/18
Smith: Adam Putnam knows Florida, but that might not be enough today to become governor

Smith: Adam Putnam knows Florida, but that might not be enough today to become governor

Here is a little secret among reporters who regularly interact with Gov. Rick Scott:Reporters know it rarely matters if they happen to miss one of the governorís periodic and brief question and answer sessions. He almost never says anything.How shou...
Published: 04/11/18
Updated: 04/13/18
Crystals may have helped Vikings sail to Greenland

Crystals may have helped Vikings sail to Greenland

When the Vikings left the familiar fjords of Norway for icy, uncharted territories, they were at the mercy of weather. They had no magnetic compasses and no way to ward off stretches of heavy clouds or fog that made it difficult to navigate by sun. H...
Published: 04/11/18
Updated: 04/13/18

Perspective: A simple two-step plan to solve Floridaís opioid crisis

Even as Floridaís opioid crisis devastates families around the state, there are real, viable solutions that could curb this epidemic, substantially reduce the cascading number of deaths and provide necessary and appropriate treatment for those addict...
Updated one month ago