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The echo chamber puts us all in danger

In 2002, New York University political scientist Russell Hardin wrote a brilliant essay called "The Crippled Epistemology of Extremism." Hardin contended that many extremists, including terrorists, are not stupid, insane or badly educated.

The real problem is that their information comes from a sharply limited set of sources, all of which are supportive of their extremist beliefs. Many extremists listen only to one another. They live in self-reinforcing information cocoons. Their "crippled epistemology" can lead to utterly baseless, but firmly held, convictions (and sometimes even violence).

Most Democrats and most Republicans are not extremists. But Hardin's argument offers lessons about 21st-century political campaigns in the United States — and about some of the most serious difficulties in contemporary governance.

How do you know what you know? You undoubtedly have firsthand knowledge about many things, including your job, your family and your possessions. But how do you know whether George Washington or James Madison really lived, whether matter consists of atoms, whether Bob Dylan wrote Like a Rolling Stone, whether Mars and Venus exist, or whether Neil Armstrong was the first person to walk on the moon?

With respect to innumerable issues, including political ones, most of what we know is what we learn from other people. By itself, that is inevitable and nothing to lament. But here is the problem. When we listen mostly to people who already agree with us, our pre-existing convictions get fortified, and we start to think that those who disagree with us are evil, dumb or duped.

A few years ago, I participated in some experiments designed to shed light on how people's political beliefs are formed. My co-authors and I assembled a number of people in Colorado into all-liberal groups and all-conservative groups. We asked the groups to discuss three issues: climate change, affirmative action and civil unions for same-sex couples.

We requested group members to state their opinions at three stages. The first occurred before they started to talk, when we recorded their views privately and anonymously. In the second stage, we asked them to discuss the issues with one another and then to reach a kind of group "verdict." In the final stage, we asked people to record their views, after discussion, privately and anonymously.

Our findings were simple. On all three issues, both liberal and conservative groups became more unified and more extreme after talking to one another. What is more striking, and more revealing about our current problems, is that after liberals spoke only with liberals, and conservatives only with conservatives, the divisions between the two groups grew dramatically. Group members learn from what they hear. Having heard the set of arguments in their group, people become more confident, more unified and more extreme.

Can anything be done to address this problem? The most obvious answer is to break out of information cocoons. That is a central goal of the American constitutional system, which was devised to ensure that diverse people would speak with one another. And in politics and government, a healthy respect for the technical expertise of scientists, lawyers and economists usually helps to anchor discussion — and to avoid a crippled epistemology. An appreciation of how we know what we know should help to engender a healthy dose of humility, making political campaigns far more productive and sensible governance far more likely.

Cass R. Sunstein, the Felix Frankfurter professor of law at Harvard University, is a Bloomberg View columnist. He is the former administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs and the author, most recently, of "On Rumors: How Falsehoods Spread."

© 2012 Bloomberg News

The echo chamber puts us all in danger 09/08/12 [Last modified: Saturday, September 8, 2012 4:31am]
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