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Castro's death resonates loudly in Latin America

A bunch of flowers to pay respect to Fidel Castro with a banner reading in Spanish "Your fight will live now and forever" is displayed outside Cuba's embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on Saturda. Castro, who led a rebel army to improbable victory, embraced Soviet-style communism and defied the power of 10 U.S. presidents during his half century rule of Cuba, died at age 90. [AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko]

A bunch of flowers to pay respect to Fidel Castro with a banner reading in Spanish "Your fight will live now and forever" is displayed outside Cuba's embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on Saturda. Castro, who led a rebel army to improbable victory, embraced Soviet-style communism and defied the power of 10 U.S. presidents during his half century rule of Cuba, died at age 90. [AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko]

MEDELLIN, COLOMBIA — Fidel Castro's death resonated across Latin America, where Cuba has played an oversized role in recent years — from brokering peace to forging political alliances and influencing ideology.

Cuba hosted more than four years of peace negotiations between Colombia and its largest guerrilla group, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC.

On Thursday, President Juan Manuel Santos and FARC Commander Rodrigo "Timochenko" Londoño signed a revised peace accord with Cuba and Norway as guarantors.

That signing also marked an end of an era: The FARC drew inspiration from the 1959 Cuban Revolution and the group was seen as, perhaps, the hemisphere's last viable guerrilla army.

"Fidel Castro recognized at the end of his days that armed struggle wasn't the path," Santos wrote on Twitter. "He contributed to putting an end to Colombia's conflict."

The FARC's chief negotiator, Iván Márquez, also thanked Castro for his "immense love for Colombia."

"May the Havana peace accords be a final homage," he tweeted.

In Venezuela, Cuba's staunchest ally in the hemisphere, President Nicolás Maduro, said he spoke to Raúl Castro early Saturday to offer his condolences. The two nations have been close since late Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez forged deep personal and ideological ties with Fidel.

"The invincible giant has gone on to meet with Che Guevara...and the Eternal Commander Hugo Chávez," Maduro wrote on Twitter.

In Venezuela, where the terms "Chávez and Fidel" were a trending topic on Twitter, some of the chatter paid homage to the two men while others skewered their legacy. Many in the Andean nation blame Cuba's ideology and oversized influence for wrecking the national economy.

"Satan declares state of emergency in hell amid possible Chávez-Fidel alliance to overthrow him," wrote one Twitter user.

In Bolivia, where Ernesto "Che" Guevara died in 1967 trying to export the Cuban revolution, President Evo Morales said Fidel had taught the region to fight for national "sovereignty and dignity."

Ecuador's Rafael Correa also took to Twitter to honor of the late Cuban leader. "A great one has left us. Fidel has died," he wrote. "Long live Cuba! Long live Latin America."

At the U.S. Navy base at Guantánamo, which both Cuban presidents — Fidel Castro and Raul Castro — have insisted should be returned to Cuban sovereignty, a spokesman said U.S. flags were still flying at half staff for the late Richard Nixon-era Secretary of Defense Melvin Laird, who passed away earlier this month in Florida at age 94.

The U.S. Southern Command, which supervises troops in Latin America and the Caribbean, had no comment Saturday morning following the passing of the elder Castro.

Miami Herald staff writer Carol Rosenberg contributed to this report.

Castro's death resonates loudly in Latin America 11/26/16 [Last modified: Saturday, November 26, 2016 11:50am]
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