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992872 2038-01-18 05:00:00.0 UTC 2038-01-18T00:00:00.000-05:00 2009-04-17 02:25:21.0 UTC 2009-04-16T22:25:21.000-04:00 byrd-alzheimers-center-seeks-5-million-in-funding-from-state Published 2009-04-17 02:39:50.0 UTC 2009-04-16T22:39:50.000-04:00 news/politics/legislature DTI 49990726 TALLAHASSEE — There's hardly a worse time to be begging the Legislature for state funding, but after getting no money last year, officials with the Johnnie B. Byrd Sr. Alzheimer's Center and Research Institute are desperately doing just that. They're seeking at least $5 million for the gleaming institute on the University of South Florida campus, and they warn of dire consequences if they don't get it: losing their federal designation as an Alzheimer's research center. "You have no chance of getting it with no state funding," said Dr. Stephen Klasko, chief executive officer of the institute and dean of the USF College of Medicine. "They would look at a state-funded center with no state funding as a center the state doesn't want to support." The Byrd Institute opened in 2007 with $15 million in annual state funding as the vision of former House Speaker Johnnie Byrd, whose father died of Alzheimer's in 1998. Last year, when a deal was cut to affiliate the institute with USF, no money was allocated. Last fall, in the wake of the lost state money, the institute laid off 19 workers and cut other expenses. Right now, there's nothing in the House budget for the Byrd Institute and only a placeholder in the Senate budget. Lawmakers say they'll work on it when the chambers meet in conference to finalize the budget next week. "I think the state has an obligation here," said Sen. Victor Crist, R-Tampa, who has relatives dealing with the disease. "If they weren't going to ante up, then they shouldn't have created it to begin with." Rep. Kevin Ambler, R-Tampa, is working on the issue in the House. "I think, at this point, this is where the rubber meets the road; they're going to have to have us put in that minimum funding in order to be eligible for those federal drawdown dollars and grants to keep the center going." The problem is the institute's prized designation as an Alzheimer's Disease Research Center is up for renewal next month. As an ARDC, the Byrd Institute gets a five-year, $7.5 million grant, access to national research data, the prestige to attract top researchers, clinical trials and more. Klasko called it "almost like the Good Housekeeping seal of approval," and said it puts Tampa at the "center of Alzheimer's activity in the state." But without state funding, Klasko isn't even sure the institute will apply for renewal. And it would have to wait a few years for another chance. Klasko says the institute has $8 million in reserves, and he thinks that could last less than a year. He says it needs $9 million a year just to maintain the level of research it's doing and keep the place running. "Could we keep the lights on for less? Yes, we could," Klasko said, but he said they cannot let its scientific purpose wane. Already, the merger with USF has allowed the institute to cut administrative costs, in addition to bringing all the Alzheimer's researchers together. The latter, Klasko said, has scientific and revenue advantages. The relationship with USF is set to be put into state statute this year under pending legislation. By Amy Hollyfield, Times/Herald Tallahassee Bureau Legislature,News,Politics Byrd Alzheimer's Center seeks $5 million in funding from state SMONTGOMERYN Without state money, the Alzheimer's institute could lose federal grant dollars. 4STB B Section Byrd center seeks $5M 1 BYRD041709.4st Byrd center seeks $5M 2009-04-17 04:00:00.0 UTC 2009-04-17T00:00:00.000-04:00 false templatedata/tampabaytimes/StaffArticle/data/2009/04/16/49990726-byrd-alzheimers-center-seeks-5-million-in-funding-from-state StaffArticle news,politicsPoliticsnews,politics,legislatureLegislative PoliticsTALLAHASSEE — There's hardly a worse time to be begging the Legislature for state funding, but after getting no money last year, officials with the Johnnie B. Byrd Sr. Alzheimer's Center and Research Institute are desperately doing just that.Legislature,News,PoliticsLegislature,News,PoliticsAmy Hollyfield 381847 2038-01-18 05:00:00.0 UTC 2038-01-18T00:00:00.000-05:00 2012-10-25 12:47:08.0 UTC 2012-10-25T08:47:08.000-04:00 amy-hollyfield published 2015-06-07 02:47:34.0 UTC 2015-06-06T22:47:34.000-04:00 Amy Hollyfield <p>Amy Hollyfield is the deputy managing editor for politics and business for the <i>Tampa Bay Times</i>. She directs state and national political coverage, including bureaus in Tallahassee and Washington, and <a href="http://www.politifact.com/">PolitiFact.com</a>, <a href="http://www.politifact.com/punditfact/">PunditFact.com</a> and <a href="http://www.politifactflorida.com/">PolitiFact Florida</a>, the <i>Times' </i>fact-checking websites. PolitiFact was awarded the 2009 Pulitzer Prize for national reporting. In addition, Amy oversees business news, Perspective and Floridian magazine. She has worked at the <i>Times</i> for more than 15 years, after previous stints at the <i>Miami Herald</i> and <i>Florida Today.</i></p> Times Staff Writer writers DTI 35040441 Amy Hollyfield is the deputy managing editor for politics and business for the Tampa Bay Times. She directs state and national political coverage, including bureaus in Tallahassee and Washington, and PolitiFact.com, PunditFact.com and PolitiFact Florida, the Times' fact-checking websites. PolitiFact was awarded the 2009 Pulitzer Prize for national reporting. In addition, Amy oversees business news, Perspective and Floridian magazine. She has worked at the Times for more than 15 years, after previous stints at the Miami Herald and Florida Today. <p>Phone: (727) 893-8491</p> <p>Email: <a href="mailto:ahollyfield@tampabay.com">ahollyfield@tampabay.com</a></p> <p>The Hollyfield file: <a href="http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/staff/amy-hollyfield/">PolitiFact.com</a></p> <p>Twitter: <a href="http://twitter.com/amy_hollyfield">@Amy_Hollyfield</a></p> 1 /resources/images/dti/2012/10/b4s_timeseditors012112d.jpg true templatedata/tampabaytimes/AuthorProfile/data/35040441-amy-hollyfield AuthorProfile 2012-10-25 12:47:08.0 UTC 2012-10-25T08:47:08.000-04:00 <span style="display:none;" class="author vcard"><span class="fn">AMY HOLLYFIELD</span></span><span style="display:none;" class="source-org vcard"><span class="org fn">Tampa Bay Times</span></span><a rel="item-license" href="/universal/user_agreement.shtml">&#169; 2016 Tampa Bay Times</a><br /><br />Times/Herald Tallahassee Bureau 2285313 2016-07-14 01:42:00.0 UTC 1 Month Ago trump-seeks-10-million-from-former-aide-in-disclosure-case news/politics/national Trump seeks $10 million from former aide in disclosure case StaffArticle 2269029 2016-03-12 00:14:17.0 UTC 5 Months Ago legislature-pledges-250-million-in-annual-funding-for-everglades-springs news/politics/stateroundup Legislature pledges $250 million in annual funding for Everglades, springs StaffArticle 2263365 2016-01-29 19:47:08.0 UTC 7 Months Ago gop-debate-without-trump-draws-125-million-viewers news/politics/national GOP debate without Trump draws 12.5 million viewers StaffArticle <p>TALLAHASSEE — There's hardly a worse time to be begging the Legislature for state funding, but after getting no money last year, officials with the Johnnie B. Byrd Sr. Alzheimer's Center and Research Institute are desperately doing just that.</p> <p>They're seeking at least $5 million for the gleaming institute on the University of South Florida campus, and they warn of dire consequences if they don't get it: losing their federal designation as an Alzheimer's research center.</p> <p>&quot;You have no chance of getting it with no state funding,&quot; said Dr. Stephen Klasko, chief executive officer of the institute and dean of the USF College of Medicine. &quot;They would look at a state-funded center with no state funding as a center the state doesn't want to support.&quot;</p> <p>The Byrd Institute opened in 2007 with $15 million in annual state funding as the vision of former House Speaker Johnnie Byrd, whose father died of Alzheimer's in 1998. Last year, when a deal was cut to affiliate the institute with USF, no money was allocated. Last fall, in the wake of the lost state money, the institute laid off 19 workers and cut other expenses.</p> <p>Right now, there's nothing in the House budget for the Byrd Institute and only a placeholder in the Senate budget. Lawmakers say they'll work on it when the chambers meet in conference to finalize the budget next week.</p> <p>&quot;I think the state has an obligation here,&quot; said Sen. Victor Crist, R-Tampa, who has relatives dealing with the disease. &quot;If they weren't going to ante up, then they shouldn't have created it to begin with.&quot;</p> <p>Rep. Kevin Ambler, R-Tampa, is working on the issue in the House. &quot;I think, at this point, this is where the rubber meets the road; they're going to have to have us put in that minimum funding in order to be eligible for those federal drawdown dollars and grants to keep the center going.&quot;</p> <p>The problem is the institute's prized designation as an Alzheimer's Disease Research Center is up for renewal next month. As an ARDC, the Byrd Institute gets a five-year, $7.5&nbsp;million grant, access to national research data, the prestige to attract top researchers, clinical trials and more. </p> <p>Klasko called it &quot;almost like the Good Housekeeping seal of approval,&quot; and said it puts Tampa at the &quot;center of Alzheimer's activity in the state.&quot;</p> <p>But without state funding, Klasko isn't even sure the institute will apply for renewal. And it would have to wait a few years for another chance.</p> <p>Klasko says the institute has $8 million in reserves, and he thinks that could last less than a year. He says it needs $9 million a year just to maintain the level of research it's doing and keep the place running.</p> <p>&quot;Could we keep the lights on for less? Yes, we could,&quot; Klasko said, but he said they cannot let its scientific purpose wane.</p> <p>Already, the merger with USF has allowed the institute to cut administrative costs, in addition to bringing all the Alzheimer's researchers together. The latter, Klasko said, has scientific and revenue advantages.</p> <p>The relationship with USF is set to be put into state statute this year under pending legislation.</p>trueruntime2016-08-30 06:01:28