Tuesday, January 23, 2018
Politics

Tutoring for poor children under quiet debate

TALLAHASSEE — The fight over subsidized tutoring in the Florida Legislature has come down to a quiet confrontation set against an unlikely backdrop — a series of budget talks between the House and Senate.

As the session winds down, the fate of the controversial program is being haggled over in private because of a last-ditch effort to tie reforms to the state budget process.

On one side, the Florida House, backed by superintendents of the state's largest school systems, wants to end mandated tutoring for poor students and give districts control over the money.

On the other, a Senate plan, backed by the for-profit tutoring industry, aims to keep tax dollars flowing to private contractors but also adds as-yet-undefined accountability measures.

Both sides met Saturday morning but have yet to reach a deal.

The sticking point in the talks is whether school districts should have the option of hiring outside tutors for their most vulnerable students — or whether they should be required to.

Subsidized tutoring, or supplemental educational services, came under scrutiny in Florida following a Tampa Bay Times investigation published in February. In a series of stories, the newspaper showed that criminals were earning tax dollars running tutoring businesses and lax regulation had allowed rampant overbilling in the $100 million program.

State Education Commissioner Tony Bennett, who has supported more flexibility for school districts, pledged changes while leaders of districts statewide called for an end to the program, which was designed to help poor children in failing schools.

But so far this year, the Legislature's efforts at reform have flagged.

Even the plan now being pushed by the House initially got a cold reception.

Earlier this month, state Rep. Kathleen Passidomo, R-Naples, unveiled the proposal as an amendment to an unrelated education bill, but the idea got no traction in the Senate.

The House proposal to stop mandating tutoring would grant school districts power over millions of federal education dollars.

Private tutoring firms have gotten a cut of that money at least for the past six years, when Florida came in line with a federal requirement to hire outside tutors.

State lawmakers passed a law to preserve the program last year, when the Obama administration granted Florida freedom from the federal requirements. The new law required districts to pay fewer federal dollars to tutoring companies, but still resulted in more than $50 million set aside statewide.

On its face, the Senate plan appears to call for even less money for tutoring next year. But the true financial impact remains unclear.

Under the current law, the tutoring companies' cut is subtracted from just a portion of all federal Title 1 money sent to a district. The Senate plan would subtract it from the total amount — a difference of millions of dollars in the state's largest districts.

Backers of the Senate plan say subsidized tutoring makes a difference for needy kids.

"I'd like to hold the line that there be money available to help those struggling kids outside of the school day," Senate President Don Gaetz said Saturday, dismissing criticism from opponents that the proposal was designed to benefit private companies.

Meanwhile, House members echoed concerns of superintendents statewide.

"Parents, teachers and administrators have said, 'Let us make the decisions for our district,' " Passidomo said. "For us to micromanage them, especially when there have been problems with (tutoring) providers, doesn't make sense."

Because the changes are being hashed out in back rooms as part of the budget, public input has been limited.

"It does feel like this is being pushed through at the end," said Hillsborough County Schools superintendent MaryEllen Elia, who opposes requirements for subsidized tutoring. "Here we are on a Saturday afternoon, and the language is changing on something that is going to be millions of dollars spent on private companies, and we have no data at all that there are any results for the money being spent."

Comments
Special counsel questions Sessions; Is Trump coming soon?

Special counsel questions Sessions; Is Trump coming soon?

WASHINGTON — Attorney General Jeff Sessions was questioned for hours in the special counsel’s Russia investigation, the Justice Department said Tuesday, as prosecutors moved closer to a possible interview with President Donald Trump about whether he ...
Updated: 3 hours ago
Bowen: Mariano to PSC?

Bowen: Mariano to PSC? "It’s a longshot’’

If this were American Idol, then Jack Mariano got past the first audition.Mariano, the Pasco County commissioner from District 5, is considered one of the "most qualified’’ applicants for an opening on the Florida Public Service Commission, the state...
Published: 01/23/18
Back to work: Government shutdown ending as Dems relent

Back to work: Government shutdown ending as Dems relent

New York TimesWASHINGTON — Congress brought an end to a three-day government shutdown on Monday as Senate Democrats buckled under pressure to adopt a short-term spending bill to fund government operations without first addressing the fate of young un...
Published: 01/22/18
Congressman combating harassment used public money on own case

Congressman combating harassment used public money on own case

WASHINGTON — Rep. Patrick Meehan, R-Pa., who has taken a leading role in fighting sexual harassment in Congress, used thousands of dollars in taxpayer money to settle his own misconduct complaint after a former aide accused him last year of making un...
Published: 01/20/18
The longer the shutdown lasts, the further the economic ripples will spread

The longer the shutdown lasts, the further the economic ripples will spread

The early days of the federal government shutdown won’t slow the U.S. economy much. No workers are missing paychecks yet, and because it is a weekend, few businesses expect to feel the effects of lost customers or suppliers.That could change, quickly...
Published: 01/20/18
Romano: If UCF is national champion, then I’m a Hollywood stud

Romano: If UCF is national champion, then I’m a Hollywood stud

Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan famously said people were entitled to their own opinions, but not their own facts.Clearly, Moynihan never dealt with Florida legislators.Because around Tallahassee, facts are fungible. They aren’t just up for debate, they...
Published: 01/19/18
Updated: 01/20/18
U.S. government shuts down; Democrats, GOP blame each other

U.S. government shuts down; Democrats, GOP blame each other

WASHINGTON — The federal government shut down at the stroke of midnight Friday, halting all but the most essential operations and marring the one-year anniversary of President Donald Trump’s inauguration in a striking display of Washington dysfunctio...
Published: 01/19/18
Updated: 01/20/18
Battle lines already forming for Menendez corruption retrial

Battle lines already forming for Menendez corruption retrial

NEWARK, N.J. — U.S. Sen. Bob Menendez might spend 2018 asking voters to re-elect him and jurors to acquit him. Prosecutors from the Department of Justice told a federal judge in New Jersey on Friday that they will seek a retrial of the Democratic sen...
Published: 01/19/18
Congress likely racing toward a government shutdown

Congress likely racing toward a government shutdown

WASHINGTON — A bitterly-divided Congress hurtled toward a government shutdown this weekend in a partisan stare-down over demands by Democrats for a solution on politically fraught legislation to protect about 700,000 younger immigrants from being dep...
Published: 01/19/18
Clearwater City Council candidate John Funk: City needs better planning

Clearwater City Council candidate John Funk: City needs better planning

CLEARWATER — Voters may not be too familiar with the name John Funk.So since launching his campaign for City Council Seat 5 against well-known incumbent Hoyt Hamilton, Funk said he has knocked on 2,000 doors to introduce himself. Before the March 13 ...
Published: 01/19/18