Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Code Pink protesters asked to leave Straz Center

TAMPA — Police asked about a dozen Code Pink protesters to leave the Straz Center for the Performing Arts on Tuesday because they were trespassing on private property.

The protesters, wearing their usual attire in all shades of pink, stood at one of the entrances with signs that read "Arrest Condi" and "Condi = war criminal."

Medea Benjamin, co-founder of Code Pink, said they were protesting against former secretary of state Condoleezza Rice because she agreed to send troops to Iraq. The protesters picked the Straz as their location because they believed Rice was scheduled to speak at the arts center Tuesday.

They held blankets with blotches of red paint — to represent blood — and waved handcuffs in the air.

But within minutes, dozens of police officers, on foot and on bicycles, arrived at the Straz. One officer approached Benjamin and asked her to leave. Several journalists swarmed around them with note pads and cameras.

Lorrin Shepard, the center's chief operating manager, also arrived and asked Benjamin and the others to leave.

"There are other events going on here," he said. "You are not allowing me to conduct my normal business, so I need to ask you to leave now."

They left the property. Benjamin later said the officer who spoke to her was "very nice, very accommodating." Police wrote down some of their names.

Jodie Evans, co-founder of Code Pink, refused to show her ID to police. "There is nothing he could do," she said. "He didn't have any right."

Code Pink protesters asked to leave Straz Center 08/28/12 [Last modified: Tuesday, August 28, 2012 2:24pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Relative 'devastated' after shooting kills 8 in Mississippi

    Nation

    BROOKHAVEN, Miss. — Head in hands, his voice strained, Vincent Mitchell sat outside his little yellow home and tried to make sense of how a family dispute led to a rampage that killed eight people, including the deputy who tried to keep them safe.

    Christianna May-Kelly, center, is supported by family members as she cries after answering reporters questions outside her parents' home in Brookhaven, Miss., Sunday. May-Kelly said her parents and mother were among the people gunned down during a shooting in rural Mississippi Saturday night. [AP photo]
  2. Forecast: Sunny, clear Memorial Day ahead of increased rain chances throughout the week

    Weather

    If you're planning on heading outside today for Memorial Day activities, the weather shouldn't get in the way.

    Tampa Bay's 7 day forecast. [WTSP]
  3. North Korean missile launch may be testing rivals, not technology

    World

    SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea's latest missile test Monday may have less to do with perfecting its weapons technology than with showing U.S. and South Korean forces in the region that it can strike them at will.

    A woman watches a TV screen showing a file footage of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, at Seoul Train Station in Seoul, South Korea, Monday,. North Korea fired a short-range ballistic missile that landed in Japan's maritime economic zone Monday, officials said, the latest in a string of test launches as the North seeks to build nuclear-tipped ICBMs that can reach the U.S. mainland. [AP Photo/Lee Jin-man]
  4. PolitiFact: Fact-checking Samantha Bee on Florida felonies

    State Roundup

    Comedian Samantha Bee traveled to Florida, where she says "retirees and democracy go to die," to shed light on how the state makes it difficult for felons to regain the right to vote.

    Samantha Bee hosts Full Frontal with Samantha Bee on TBS. Bee portrayed some of Florida’s felonies as not so serious on her show.
  5. For some, Memorial Day comes around more than just once a year

    Military

    ST. PETERSBURG — It is shortly before nine on a Friday morning, and the heat is already approaching unbearable levels at Bay Pines National Cemetery.

    Iles carefully digs up the St. Augustine grass so that it will continue to grow when it is placed back on the gravesite. He tries not to disturb the root base.