Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Donald Trump Jr., running the family business, says he has nearly 'zero contact' with his father

"I basically have zero contact with him at this point," Donald Trump Jr. said at a  GOP fundraiser Saturday, according to NBC News. The  network reported that the Texas event - the group's annual Reagan Day dinner   - was his first political function since his father's inauguration. [Associated Press[

"I basically have zero contact with him at this point," Donald Trump Jr. said at a GOP fundraiser Saturday, according to NBC News. The network reported that the Texas event - the group's annual Reagan Day dinner - was his first political function since his father's inauguration. [Associated Press[

During the presidential campaign, Donald Trump Jr. was one of the most ardent and visible supporters of his father's candidacy.

The eldest son of President Donald Trump traveled nationwide, giving speeches, holding fundraisers and appearing on television to stump for his dad — and even advocating for some of his own causes during the transition.

Now, though, the younger Trump says he hardly keeps in touch with his father anymore.

"I basically have zero contact with him at this point," he said at a Dallas County GOP fundraiser Saturday, according to NBC News. The news network reported that the Texas event — the group's annual Reagan Day dinner also attended by Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas — was his first political function since his father's inauguration.

"I thought I was out of politics after Election Day and get back to my regular life and my family," Donald Jr. added, according to NBC. "But I couldn't."

It is unclear what "basically ... zero contact" encompasses in terms of actual communication — or what Trump's eldest son meant when he said he couldn't stay away from politics. The Trump organization did not immediately respond to an email Sunday.

But Donald Jr.'s comments came as the relationships between the president, his adult children and the Trump organization continue to face scrutiny.

Since Trump was elected, his opponents have sought to make sure the billionaire and head of the family real estate and licensing company disentangles himself from his business interests.

During the transition, an attorney for Trump said at a much-hyped news conference that the president-elect had "relinquished leadership and management of the Trump organization." The management of the family business would fall to his two adult sons, Donald Jr. and Eric, as well as longtime Trump executive Allen Weisselberg. (Trump's older daughter, Ivanka Trump, already had left her position as executive vice president of the business, after facing allegations of conflict of interest.)

However, Trump's critics have said that the president has not done enough to isolate himself from potential conflicts of interest by choosing not to divest from or sell off his shares in the Trump organization. As the Washington Post reported in January, some ethics advisers saw the setup creating a "potential back channel for investors to curry favor with the new president."

"Even if Trump had divested, given the nature and extent of the domestic and global conflicts, what was called for was a full-time ethics czar," Norm Eisen, a chief White House ethics adviser during the Obama administration, told the Post then. "But given the fact that Trump did not make a clean ownership break, the risk and complexity is only escalated."

Last week, three watchdog groups asked then-U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara to investigate whether the president violated the "emoluments clause" of the Constitution by receiving payments or other benefits from foreign governments through his business interests.

As the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, Bharara worked in a jurisdiction that includes the Manhattan headquarters of the Trump organization. In their letter, the watchdog groups urged Bharara to look into whether any "foreign governments may be seeking to influence Executive Branch policies and positions."

It is unclear whether Bharara had initiated any investigation or responded to the groups' letter. The federal prosecutor had over his nearly eight-year tenure developed a reputation for being tough on corruption on Wall Street and by politicians on both sides of the aisle. Trump himself had met with Bharara during his transition to discuss "whether or not I'd be prepared to stay on ... to do the work as we have done it, independently, without fear or favor, for the last seven years," the attorney said.

However, within a week of receiving that letter, Bharara abruptly lost his job, part of a house-cleaning of 46 U.S. attorneys appointed by President Barack Obama. Bharara said Saturday he was fired after he refused to tender his resignation.

Donald Trump Jr., running the family business, says he has nearly 'zero contact' with his father 03/12/17 [Last modified: Sunday, March 12, 2017 6:47pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, Washington Post.
    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Peter Budaj, Lightning lose to Devils in shootout; Nikita Kucherov scores

    Lightning Strikes

    NEWARK, N.J. — For Peter Budaj, Tuesday's season debut had a shaky start.

    The Lightning’s Vladislav Namestnikov, right, battles Damon Severson for the puck.
  2. Mother's testimony about toddler's death brings judge to tears

    Criminal

    TAMPA — Nayashia Williams woke up early on May 7, 2014, to the sound of her daughter calling for her. It was the last time the young mother's mornings would begin with a summons from Myla Presley, who couldn't yet climb over the mesh fencing around the playpen she used as a bed.

    Deandre Gilmore looks towards the gallery Tuesday in a Tampa courtroom. Gilmore is accused of killing the 19 month-old daughter of his girlfriend in 2014. He said the child fell while he was giving her a bath. [CHRIS URSO   |   Times]
  3. Speakers: Getting tough can't be only response to teen car thefts

    Crime

    ST. PETERSBURG — Bob Dillinger remembers coming to Pinellas County as a legal intern in 1975. There were five major poverty zones in St. Petersburg.

    Wengay Newton, Florida House of Representatives (in front, in center), talks as a panelist to a packed room during a community forum on "Reclaiming our Youth: Is Juvenile Justice a Reality?" at the Dr. Carter G. Woodson Museum in St. Petersburg Wednesday evening (10/17/17). The event was presented by the Fred G. Minnis, Sr. Bar Association. Community leaders discussed the ongoing auto theft epidemic among Pinellas youth.
  4. Internal White House documents allege manufacturing decline increases abortions, infertility and spousal abuse

    Politics

    White House officials working on trade policy were alarmed last month when a top adviser to President Donald Trump circulated a two-page document that alleged a weakened manufacturing sector leads to an increase in abortion, spousal abuse, divorce and infertility, two people familiar with the matter told the …

  5. Black entrepreneur says city stiffing him on project after he endorsed Rick Baker

    News

    ST. PETERSBURG — A prominent African-American resident says his endorsement of mayoral candidate Rick Baker has led city officials to freeze him out of a major construction project along the historic "Deuces" stretch of 22nd Street S.