Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Justice Department to monitor five Florida counties during Tuesday primary

Officials with the U.S. Department of Justice will monitor today's primaries in five Florida counties — Collier, Hendry, Lee, Osceola and Polk — to make sure that elections officials there will provide language assistance in Spanish.

The DOJ announced the monitoring Monday in a short news release, which also mentioned that the city of Milwaukee, Wis., would be monitored as well. It's not certain if the oversight was regular procedure or sparked by complaints. Each year, the DOJ deploys hundreds of federal observers to monitor elections across the nation.

But the department doesn't comment as to how jurisdictions are chosen for monitoring, said Mitchell Rivard, a DOJ spokesman.

The list of Florida counties include two of five — Collier and Hendry — that are subject to federal pre-clearance of changes in voting procedures.

In 1972, those counties used English language ballots for non-English speaking voters, which was classified as a documented case of discrimination based on race or language. But the other three counties requiring pre-clearance — Hardee, Monroe and Hillsborough — were not included on the list of counties that will be monitored today.

"We haven't been notified," said Travis Abercrombie, spokesman for the Hillsborough County Supervisor of Elections office.

Despite recent tension between the DOJ and Florida's efforts to purge voter rolls of suspected noncitizens, the monitoring appears to be unrelated. In July, the DOJ sued Florida for the purge, alleging it ignored a requirement that it get approval first.

Chris Cate, a spokesman for the Florida Division of Elections, said he thinks the monitoring is routine, but said he would find out more later today.

Justice Department to monitor five Florida counties during Tuesday primary 08/13/12 [Last modified: Tuesday, August 14, 2012 10:52am]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Deandre Gilmore guilty, but not of murder, jury decides

    Criminal

    TAMPA — The actions of Deandre Gilmore caused the death of his girlfriend's 19-month-old daughter in 2014, but a Hillsborough County jury decided Friday it was manslaughter, not murder.

    Deandre Gilmore looks towards the gallery Tuesday, Oct. 17, 2017 in a Tampa courtroom. Gilmore is accused of killing Myla Presley the 19 month-old daughter of his then girlfriend Nayashia Williams while Gilmore was giving her a bath.
  2. Bucs-Bills: Things to watch in Sunday's 1 p.m. game

    Bucs

    FILE - In this Oct. 1, 2017, file photo, Buffalo Bills running back LeSean McCoy (25) runs past Atlanta Falcons' De'Vondre Campbell (59) and Deion Jones (45) during the second half of an NFL football game, in Atlanta. The Bills play against the Buccaneers in Buffalo on Sunday. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File) NY182
  3. Koetter: QB Jameis Winston will start Sunday vs. Bills

    Bucs

    After five days of uncertainty, Jameis Winston will be starting at quarterback on Sunday as the Bucs play at Buffalo, coach Dirk Koetter announced Friday afternoon.

    Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Jameis Winston (3) watches a replay while sitting out with an injury during the second half of an NFL game between the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Arizona Cardinals at University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Ariz., on Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017.
  4. What to watch this weekend: 'The Walking Dead,' Stephen King's '1922'

    Blogs

    100 episodes of walkers: The Walking Dead

    Danai Gurira and Andrew Lincoln in The Walking Dead.
  5. Editorial: GOP failing to protect health care for Florida kids

    Editorials

    In Tallahassee, the Florida Legislature is considering how to make it easier for low-income families to apply for subsidized health insurance for their children. In Washington, Congress cannot even agree on how to keep paying for the popular program. There is a disconnect that threatens health coverage for about 215,000 …

    In Tallahassee, the Florida Legislature is considering how to make it easier for low-income families to apply for subsidized health insurance for their children. In Washington, Congress cannot even agree on how to keep paying for the popular program.